Civil War Relicman,
Harry Ridgeway

Winchester, Virginia USA, changed hands 70 times in the Civil War!
authentic Civil War relics, bought and sold
.
relicman.com.
Sales page updated, December 27, 2016.

Civil War artillery, Relicman sales catalog. , page 1.
Page one, items for sale, please refer to Relicman stock number when ordering, item numbers beginning to A1499.

All items listed are authentic to the Civil War or as otherwise described.
All artillery items listed have been disarmed.
Any excavated relics have been recovered from private property with owners permission.


A0057...Rifled artillery projectile, Hotchkiss design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pattern with flame grooves, rounded nose, "case shot" lead balls packed loose without matrix or with asphalt matrix, iron separator bolt, lead band sabot, Hotchkiss brass time fuze, James 14 pounder rifle, 3.8in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Andrew Hotchkiss. The pattern consisted of three parts, a nose section containing the explosive charge, a cast iron cup fitted on the bottom, and lead band sabot cast around the middle, on firing the cup would compress the lead band sabot expanding it into the rifling. Some of these shells were "common" or standard rounds, explosive charge only, or "case shot", filled with balls. This is "case shot", with a time fuze it was designed to be used against troops by spreading large volume of fragments and balls over the open field of fighting. Lead balls were packed in sawdust only, early production, or black asphalt matrix, later production. The nose is rounded to accomodate the extra load of balls and the casting in the nose is thin to encourage breakage forward in the nose. There are two chambers in the nose, all of the powder is in the lower chamber, all of the balls are in the upper chamber, there is an iron seperator bolt in the middle, with a hole and a narrow metal channel to allow the flame to pass from the fuze to detonate the powder in the lower chamber. On detonation, the exploding powder in the base was expected to push the seperator bolt and the balls forward and out the weak top section of the nose. The nose was cast as one part, the bottom is solid, the separator bolt apparently was precast and imbedded in the core, then positioned after casting once the core was removed, it is larger than the fuze opening. Three flame grooves added so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze. Fuze employed was a Hotchkiss brass time fuze, with slots and a flange, Jones pg. 87. Hotchkiss patent date was cast, not stamped, into the base, "HOTCHKISS PATENT OCTOBER 9, 1855 / MAY 14, 1861", and is typically very weak and may have been omitted entirely as the molds wore down or were replaced.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 179.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.7in., length 6.75in. fired sabot compressed, weight 15lbs. Lead band sabot is fired, 15 lands and grooves from James rifle are weak, sabot is distorted from firing but did not take the rifling. Hotchkiss brass time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Vicksburg, Mississippi.
For sale............ $450.

A0063...Rifled artillery projectile, Tennessee design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, pattern with, rounded nose smooth sides, copper disc sabot with 3 studs in the shell and flush mounted bolt, wood time fuze, Blakeley 12 pounder rifle, 3.5in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured and was originally believed to have been developed by Mullane working with Read and others, however, updated research has not been able to confirm the existence of a man named Mullane. Period literature often refers to work as the "Tennessee" design, cup, or sabot, and is attributed to Captain Lardner Gibbon, although official recognition for his development was never granted. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by studs and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This sabot pattern, referred to as Type I, employed three long studs cast into the shell body fitted through the disc sabot, a short bolt secured the copper disc flush mounted. Performance of this sabot was unsatisfactory, typically the studs or the bolt would break on firing releasing or distorting the copper disc sabot. Sides are smooth. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 211.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.4in., length 6.5in. shell body, 7.25 overall weight 11.0lbs. Sabot is fired showing 7 lands and grooves, and is intact. Wood fuze is missing. Projectile is disarmed: open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Fredericksburg, Virginia.
For sale............ $1,000.

A0066...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern "common" (standard), wrought iron sabot, Hotchkiss time fuze, Parrott 20 pounder rifle, 3.67in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the prewar invention of Robert Parrott and John Read working together. The sabot system utilized was a wrought iron ring, referred to as the "Type I" sabot, rifling was precast with five flanges, because it was too stiff to take the rifling otherwise. Some of these shells were configured as case shot, (approx. 17.5lbs to 19lbs. with balls, short, 9.25in.), or as "common" (approx 15lbs. to 17lbs. without balls, long 10.25in.). This shell is a "common" shell, (standard), it does not contain balls, and with a time fuze it was designed to be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Hotchkiss brass time fuze, with slots and a flange, Jones pg. 87. Bottom of shell usually shows a casting sprue which was rough milled.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 219.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.6in., length 10.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 15.8lbs. Wrought iron sabot shows five precast lands and grooves. Hotchkiss time fuze is intact. Metal solid with areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through paper section of time fuze. Recovered: Vicksburg, Mississippi.
For sale............ $250.

A0072...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern "common" (standard), high band sawtooth brass ring sabot, Parrott percussion fuze West Point Style, Parrott 20 pounder rifle, 3.67in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Robert Parrott. The sabot system utilized was an early development of the high band sabot, this pattern with the triangular or saw-tooth shaped edge is now determined to be a prototype preceding the high band Type II Parrott sabot, it was apparently tested briefly and abandoned. All projectiles of this sabot type are "common" shell, (standard), not containing balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Parrott zinc percussion fuze, "West Point" style two part fuze, Jones pg. 79, fuze hole will have a thin milled lip. Bottom of shell usually shows a casting sprue which was rough milled.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), not listed, sabot style shown for 30 pounder Bell pg. 283.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.66in., length 10.75in. (excluding fuze), weight 18lbs. Fired sabot intact showing 5 lands and grooves. Parrott percussion fuze is jammed inside the throat. Metal quality strong. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the side. Recovered: battlefield or test range not known, rare shell.
For sale............ $700.

A0086...Rifled artillery projectile, Read design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with bourrelet rings, tall copper ring sabot with notch, copper time fuze, Confederate rifle, 3.25 or 3.3 in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured during the war employing John Read's design, probably at Selma Arsenal. This pattern utilized two wide bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough. The nose is relatively pointed, and the width of the bourrelet rings varies considerably, presumably this is operator variance in the finishing process. The base is raised and milled to a bevel leaving a depressed ring between the base and the sabot, lathe dimple is found on the base. Read developed this copper ring sabot, it was more flexible than the earlier wrought iron sabot, sabot is tapered at the top and seated in a deep groove well inside of the iron base, flame grooves were cut into the sabot. Copper ring sabot was cast thin. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, two spanner holes, Jones pg. 41.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 268.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.2in., length 6.6in. (excluding fuze), weight 7.7lbs. Sabot is not fired. Copper time fuze intact. Metal quality solid. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Oconee River cache near Milledgeville, Georgia, which apparently was used as a site after the war to dispose of obsolete Civil War ordnance
For sale............$450.

A0088...Rifled artillery projectile, Read design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with smooth sides milled sleeve, pointed nose, thick copper ring sabot not milled and not pre-rifled, wood time fuze, Confederate 20 pounder rifle, 3.67in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured during the war. Read developed this copper sabot, it was more flexible than the earlier wrought iron sabot. A smooth sided long shell was produced by both sides, this Confederate version is distinguished by a lathe dimple in the base, a casting sprue on the nose, and the smooth sides were finished by turning on a lathe. The shell was lathe turned, a slightly deeper cut was made at the top and the bottom leaving the impression of a "sleeve" the depth and dimension will vary considerably and is likely the result of operator variation in the finishing process. Copper ring sabot is tapered at the top and seated in a deep groove well inside of the iron base, ring was cast thick, this model was not milled and not pre-rifled. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 284

Projectile measures: diameter 3.63in., length 10.25in., weight 16lbs. Sabot is fired and spread to a larger diameter during firing but was too thick to take the rifling. Wood time fuze is partial. Metal is solid. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Grand Gulf, Mississippi
For sale............ ....$500.

A0091...Rifled artillery projectile, Read design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with smooth sides, blunt nose, wrought iron sabot pre-cast rifling, copper time fuze, Confederate 20 pounder rifle, 3.67in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following the prewar invention of Robert Parrott and John Read working together. The sabot system utilized was a wrought iron ring, the Confederate version developed by Read is generally thinner than the Federal pattern. Both sides produced a smooth sided long shell, this Confederate version is distinguished by a lathe dimple in the base, a casting sprue on the nose, and the smooth sides were finished by turning on a lathe, nose on this pattern is bluntly rounded. Although the wrought iron sabot was cast much thinner than the Federal counterpart, it still did not take the rifling satisfactorily, five lands and grooves were precast into this sabot. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, two spanner holes, Jones pg. 41. Projectile measures: diameter 3.6in., length 9.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 16.6lbs. Sabot is intact with five pre-rifled lands and grooves, intended for firing from a Parrott type rifle. Copper time fuze intact. Metal quality is solid.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 281.

Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Petersburg Virginia, Oct 8 1966, by Mac Mason, this shell was photographed in Mason book pg. 115 upper right. Unfortunately Mr. Masons famous artwork was lost when shell was restored.
For sale............ ....$700.

A0098...Rifled artillery projectile, Schenkl design Confederate adaptation, Confederate manufacture Marshall arsenal, solid bolt, wood sleeve sabot, likely 3.8 in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured at Marshall Arsenal, Marshall Texas. The design utilized many features from the Federal Schenkl design, but is a unique Confederate design and not a copy. The Confederates replaced the paper sleeve from the Federal design with a wooden sleeve fitted over the bottom, it is not clear if they were having trouble replicating the paper sabot or they thought wood would be superior. This bolt design does not seem to have had any way to actually secure the wood sabot, it likely slipped badly. It is not entirely clear what gun this was intended for, measurements of these crude shells vary, diameter seems too large for a 20 pounder but small for 3.8in. Confederates did not copy the James 14 pounder, this is the likely intended caliber, which means these were made for guns expected to be captured. and likely the wood sabot would fill to 3.8 in. Due either to poor performance or shortage of the guns, production and use of this pattern was extremely limited.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 311.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.6in., length 9.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 12.3lbs. Wood sabot missing. Projectile is disarmed, solid casting never had a bursting cavity. Recovered: Provencal, Louisiana, an unfired cache.
For sale............$1,000.

A0111...Rifled artillery projectile, Broun design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, long pattern with bourrelet rings and blunt nose, copper ring sabot, Brooke rifle, 7 in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following William Broun's design. The sabot system utilized was a thin copper band sabot, notched into the base of the projectile. This pattern projectile utilized a wide bourrelet band at the top, the sabot was slightly larger than the rest of the projectile and served as a second bourrelet, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough. The top is only slightly rounded, this flat top was designed to deliver maximum impact against the Federal ironclads.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 201.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.5in. weight 120lbs. Heavy high band sabot is un-fired. Metal solid with some pitting, sabot intact. projectile disarmed, solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Mobile Alabama defenses.
For sale............$2,500.

A0113...Rifled artillery projectile, Dahlgren design, Federal manufacture, blind shell with brass cap, lead cup sabot, rifled boat howitzer, 3.4 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the design of John Dahlgren. The pattern employed a lead cup sabot with a groove in the middle on which greased twine was affixed, this to lubricate. The bottom of the projectile was cast with five ribs onto which the lead cup sabot was affixed. In addition four raised ribs were placed on the side, which were slightly wider than the rifling grooves in the cannon and designed to guide the projectile through the bore, but without catching on the grooves. These projectiles were cast with a cavity, the casting sand was usually left in the core, unfinished hole was plugged with a small brass plug, giving it the effect of a light bolt. This was probably intended as a transitional measure to test the pattern, the shell could be drilled and fitted for fuzes at a later time. These "blind shells" never had an explosive charge, the black substance sometimes found inside is foundry sand from the mold for the core.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 385.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.42in., length 7.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 11.2lbs. Sabot is fired and intact showing light rifling. Metal is solid. Projectile is disarmed: this casting does have a cavity but none were filled with a bursting charge. Recovered: Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.
For sale............$1,000.

A0114...Rifled artillery projectile, Dahlgren design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, threaded for a fuze, lead cup sabot, rifled boat howitzer, 3.4 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the design of John Dahlgren. The pattern employed a lead cup sabot with a groove in the middle on which greased twine was affixed, this to lubricate. The bottom of the projectile was cast with five ribs onto which the lead cup sabot was affixed. In addition four raised ribs were placed on the side, which were slightly wider than the rifling grooves in the cannon and designed to guide the projectile through the bore, but without catching on the grooves. These projectiles were cast with a cavity, this pattern was drilled drilled and fitted for fuze, however none have been recovered with a fuze.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 386.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.42in., length 7.25in. (excluding fuze), weight 11.4lbs. Sabot is not fired and intact. Threaded fuze not installed. Metal is solid, minor areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed: open fuze hole exposes empty interior. solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: surplus stocks.
For sale............$1,000.

A0116...Rifled artillery projectile, Hotchkiss design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, pattern with no flame grooves pointed nose, flat bottom, lead band sabot, Navy rifled boat howitzer, 3.4in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Andrew Hotchkiss. The pattern consisted of three parts, a nose section containing the explosive charge, a cast iron cup fitted on the bottom, and lead band sabot cast around the middle, on firing the cup would compress the lead band sabot expanding it into the rifling. Shell is solid casting, or "bolt" and was designed to be used against opposing cannon by striking the equipment. This pattern was designed for the Navy, to be used on boat howitzer, which was a small gun positioned on the bow. Nose is pointed, base is flat, and sabot was fitted leaving significant gap at both the top and the bottom.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 395.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.34in., length 7.25in. (excluding fuze), weight 10.7lbs., sabot missing. Lead band sabot separated on firing. Metal solid, note several casting flaws. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered White Horse Landing, Virginia.
For sale............$350.

A0117...Rifled artillery projectile, Mullane or Tennessee design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, long pattern with blunt nose, bourrelet rings, copper disc cupped sabot with 3 studs in the sabot, Brooke rifle, 7in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured and was believed to have been developed by Mullane working with Read and others, although Mullane was never granted a patent and updated research has not been able to confirm the existence of a man named Mullane. Period literature often refers to work as the "Tennessee" design, cup, or sabot, however this latter seems to be more of a collaboration and is not specific. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by studs and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This sabot pattern, referred to as Type II, employed three studs cast into the sabot and fitted into holes cast into the shell body, secured by a bolt in the center. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough , the top is only slightly rounded, this flat top was designed to deliver maximum impact against the Federal ironclads. This long bolt was the heaviest of the Confederate bolts and likely intended for the new rifled Brooke rifles.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 425.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 14.25in., weight 123lbs. Sabot is not fired and intact. Projectile is disarmed: casting is solid iron. Recovered: James River, Virginia area, near the 1865 battle involving the CSS "Richmond" which after running aground, apparently discharged a number of these heavy shells to lighten up its load to escape the grounding.
For sale............$2,000.

A0119...Rifled artillery projectile, Schenkl design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with rounded grooved base, paper sleeve sabot, Schenkl percussion fuze, Dahlgren 30 pounder rifle, 4.4 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals, following the design of John P. Schenkl. The sabot system consisted of a "forcing cone" paper sleeve, which was intended to expand into the rifling, then flutter away on release. Problems with the paper absorbing moisture or swelling and blocking passage of the flame on firing rendered it impractical with time fuzes and so it saw limited application. This pattern with grooves in a rounded tail, was intended for Navy use with the Dahlgren 30 pounder rifle. This early pattern was apparently field tested at Port Hudson, then rejected. It is a "common" or standard round and will not be filled with balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was the Schenkl Navy percussion fuze, removable cap had a slider and percussion cap, head is 1.4in, 12 threads per inch, marked: "JP SCHENKL / PAT OCT 16 1861", Jones pg. 102, top of fuze hole is milled flat.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 364.

Projectile measures: diameter 4.38in., length 9.2in. (excluding the fuze), weight 15.8lbs. Schenkl percussion fuze is intact and removable. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Port Hudson, Louisiana.
For sale............$800.

A0126...Hand grenade, Confederate design, spherical projectile, Selma Arsenal manufacture, wood fuze, 2.5 in. Projectile was a small iron ball, light enough to be tossed by hand. Projectile was manufactured at Selma, Alabama arsenal. Fuze employed was a small wood fuze, the igniter would be fired with a hand match and then the ball tossed into an enemy trench.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 500.

Ball measures 2.5in., weight 1.25lbs. Wood fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Selma river, Alabama by Steve Phillips.
For sale............$2,000.

A0135...Artillery projectile, stand of grape, contained by rings and plates, iron balls, no sabot, 32 pounder, or rifle 6.4in. The stand of grape was the artillerist's weapon of last resort. Once the enemy got close to the battery, the gunners would load these rounds, and the flimsy stand would burst on firing sending the contents in scatter fashion against the troops charging the cannon. The fire was devastating against the troops but the enemy would be so close that options to reload and shoot would have been limited. The stand of grape consisted of top and bottom plates, held together with a bolt and nut, three rows of three balls (9 total) were stacked around the post, and held in place with two rings and the bolt. The bolt is held in place by a threaded nut on the top, bottom is loosely fitted into a slightly irregular hole on the bottom plate. Based on the diameter of this projectile, it is believed that this could be used with any 6.4in. cannon, smoothbore 32 pounder, rifled 32 pounder or the Confederate Brook rifle.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 105.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.2 in., length 8 in., weight 39lbs. Individual balls will measure 2.875in. approximately, the balls are often irregular. Dug projectile, all parts original this has never been taken apart. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting, never had a bursting charge. This was one of the stands found in an abandoned battery by Jim Nall, as published in the NSTVol VI No 3 March April 1979, pg. 26.
For sale............Sold.

A0142...Rifled artillery projectile, Brooke design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, smooth sided pattern, copper ratchet disc sabot, copper time fuze, Confederate 30 pounder rifle, 4.2in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following John Brooke's design. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by ratchet ribs cast into both the heavy sabot and shell body, and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. Sides of this pattern are smooth, bourrelet rings were used for the larger calibers but not this pattern. Fuze employed was a copper percussion fuze, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 52 and sequence.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 157
.

Projectile measures: diameter 4.1in., length 13.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 27.0lbs. Heavy copper disc sabot is fired, but barely took the rifling. Sabot and sabot bolt are intact, bolt is removable and may be replacement. Copper time fuze intact. Metal solid with areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through paper section of time fuze. Recovered: Bermuda Hundred, Virginia, 1974 by Mac Mason.
For sale............$1,000.

A0148...Rifled artillery projectile, Harding design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, Girardey wood percussion fuze, copper ring sabot, Confederate rifled 32 pounder, 6.4in. Projectile is Confederate manufacture, apparently following the design of "Harding", although at this point we really do not know who this designer was. The Harding sabot is very similar to the Federal Parrott sabots, it is a copper ring cast onto the shell and secured by notches. Shells are short and appear to have been manufactured for use in 32 pounder smoothbores, reconditioned and banded with rifling. Bolt has smooth sides, pointed nose. Fuze employed was a wood sleeved Girardey percussion fuze, Jones pg. 66, usually only the wood sleeve is recovered. All recoveries have been from Charleston, South Carolina.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 230.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.3in., length 11in., weight 50lbs. Sabot is fired, showing 10 lands and grooves and is intact.  Fuze recovered with this shell shows raised section of the Girardey fuze, and is loose. Projectile recovered from dry ground. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Charleston South Carolina, bombardment of Long Island.
For sale.............$1,200.

A0151...Rifled artillery projectile, Hotchkiss design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pattern with flame grooves, rounded nose "case shot" iron balls, lead band sabot, Hotchkiss lead time fuze, siege rifle, 4.5 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Andrew Hotchkiss. The pattern consisted of three parts, a nose section containing the explosive charge, a cast iron cup fitted on the bottom, and lead band sabot cast around the middle, on firing the cup would compress the lead band sabot expanding it into the rifling. Some of these shells were configured as case shot, filled with balls, or as "common", standard, without balls. This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. This pattern features a rounded nose designed to pack additional "case shot" balls, the fuze is lead and the balls are iron. Three flame grooves were added so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze. On case shot shells, there is no bottom plug, but there is a small internal pin apparently holding the separator bolt in place. Projectile is equipped with Hotchkiss lead or zinc time fuze, early pattern without flange (Jones pg. 86). Bottom is marked: "HOTCHKISS PATENT OCTOBER 9, 1855 / MAY 14, 1861"., this is cast into the pattern and is not stamped.

Projectile measures: diameter 4.45in., length 10.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 30lbs. Sabot is not fired and intact, cut on side is from farmers plow. Time fuze is missing, fuze hole is threaded. Metal is solid, minor areas of pitting, projectile has not been cleaned. Projectile is disarmed: open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 247
For sale............$850.

A0159...Rifled artillery projectile, Mullane or Tennessee design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with bourrelet rings, rounded nose, copper disc sabot with 3 studs in the sabot and flush mounted bolt, threaded fuze, rifled 32 pounder, 6.4 in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured and was believed to have been developed by Mullane working with Read and others, although Mullane was never granted a patent and updated research has not been able to confirm the existence of a man named Mullane. Period literature often refers to work as the "Tennessee" design, cup, or sabot, however this latter seems to be more of a collaboration and is not specific. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by studs and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This sabot pattern, referred to as Type II, employed three studs cast into the sabot and fitted into holes cast into the shell body, secured by a bolt in the center. Performance of this sabot was unsatisfactory, typically the studs or the bolt would break on firing releasing or distorting the copper disc sabot. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough, the casting is crude, and the width and depth of the rings also vary by the depth of the milling. Shell is threaded for a fuze, probably Confederate percussion fuze , Jones pg. 56 top right .
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 420.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.33in., length 9.75 in shell body only, length 11in. (overall with sabot), weight 57lbs. Sabot is fired showing weak lands and grooves, and is intact. Threaded fuze is missing. Metal is solid, minor areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed: open fuze hole exposes empty interior. solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Virginia.
For sale............$2,000.

A0167...Rifled artillery projectile, Broun design, Confederate manufacture, bursting projectile, long pattern with smooth sides, copper ring sabot, copper percussion fuze, Confederate 30 pounder rifle, 4.2 in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following William Broun's design. The sabot system utilized was a thin copper band sabot, notched into the base of the projectile. This pattern projectile with a rounded nose, is smooth sided,. A lathe dimple in the base, and a casting sprue on the nose are usually noted. This pattern was produced late in the war as iron was in short supply, recycled material was often used and the metal quality of these projectiles is almost always poor. Fuze employed was a copper percussion fuze, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 52 and sequence.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 198.

Projectile measures: diameter 4.1in., length 12.25in. (excluding fuze), weight 27.3lbs. Fired sabot shows distortion from firing, but is intact, base chip exposes some of the fastening lugs. Copper percussion fuze was jammed into the fuze hole on impact. Metal solid with areas of pitting. projectile is disarmed: drill hole through the side. Recovered: not known.
For sale............$950.

A0282...Rifled artillery projectile, Read design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with smooth sides, segmented interior, copper ring sabot milled, copper time fuze, Confederate 3.4in. or Blakely rifle, 3.5in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured during the war. Read developed this copper sabot, it was more flexible than the earlier wrought iron sabot Both sides produced a smooth sided shell, this Confederate version is distinguished by a lathe dimple in the base, a casting sprue on the nose, and the smooth sides were finished by turning on a lathe, nose on this pattern is bluntly rounded. Copper ring sabot is tapered at the top and seated in a deep groove well inside of the iron base, ring was cast thick, then milled to a thin edge at the bottom. Interior of the shell was segmented in star shape, an innovation to produce more even fragmentation. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, two spanner holes, Jones pg. 41. It is not entirely clear what gun this was intended for, specimens noted seem to vary in diameter from 3.35 in to 3.45 inch which may be measurement variance caused by corrosion, distortion of sabots from firing, or machining quality variations. Many were found at High Bridge Virginia which was a low priority outpost and may have been equipped with an older smoothbore gun bored and retrofitted to take these rifled projectiles or it could have been intended for the 12 pounder Blakely rifle, 3.5 inch.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 271 or 274.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.35in., length 7.75in. (excluding fuze), weight 10.9lbs. Sabot is not fired. Time fuze intact. Metal is solid, minor areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed: drill hole through paper section of time fuze. Recovered: High Bridge, Virginia.
For sale............$800.

A0299...Rifled artillery projectile, Hotchkiss design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pattern with flame grooves, flat top "case shot" lead balls, lead band sabot, Hotchkiss brass time fuze , Ordnance rifle, 3in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Andrew Hotchkiss. The pattern consisted of three parts, a nose section containing the explosive charge, a cast iron cup fitted on the bottom, and lead band sabot cast around the middle, on firing the cup would compress the lead band sabot expanding it into the rifling. Some of these shells were configured as case shot, filled with balls, or as "common", without balls. This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. This pattern features a nearly flat nose designed to pack additional "case shot" balls, the fuze is brass and the balls are lead. Three flame grooves added so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze. Shell cavity is split into two parts, upper chamber contained iron balls, bottom chamber contained the explosive charge, on detonation a bolt would force the balls out the top of the shell. Bottom of shell is rounded. Fuze employed was a Hotchkiss brass time fuze, with slots and a flange, Jones pg. 87.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 168.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 6.25in. (excluding fuze), weight 8.9lbs. Lead band sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Hotchkiss brass time fuze intact.Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Spanish Fort Alabama.
For sale............$350.

A0300...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern "common" (standard), high band scalloped or corrugated brass ring sabot, Parrott percussion fuze West Point Style, Parrott 20 pounder rifle, 3.67in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Robert Parrott. The sabot system utilized was an early development of the high band sabot, this pattern with the scalloped or corrugated shaped edge is now determined to be a prototype preceding the high band Type II Parrott sabot, it was apparently tested briefly and abandoned. All projectiles of this sabot type are "common" shell, (standard), not containing balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Parrott zinc percussion fuze, "West Point" style two part fuze, Jones pg. 79, fuze hole will have a thin milled lip. Bottom of shell usually shows a casting sprue which was rough milled.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 227.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.65in., length 10.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 16.6lbs. Fired sabot intact showing 5 lands and grooves. Parrott percussion fuze is partial. Metal quality strong, with areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the bottom. Recovered: battlefield or test range not known, rare shell.
For sale............$400.

A0323...Rifled artillery projectile, Selma Arsenal design, Confederate Selma manufacture, solid bolt, pattern with bourreleted rings pointed nose, short pattern, copper disc sabot, Confederate rifle, 3.67in. Projectile is Confederate manufactured at the arsenal at Selma, Alabama. The pattern utilized a thick copper disc sabot cast around a clover leaf post on the bottom of the shell. Most production was originally stamped with "G" denoting Selma, the stamping is usually on the sabot but is sometimes weak. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough. Nose is pointed, twine was placed in the groove above the sabot.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 319.
Projectile measures: diameter 3.6in., length 5.75in., weight 10lbs. Sabot is fired showing 15 lands and grooves, distortion from firing and is partial, it appears this projectile was fired from a captured James Rifle, which would have been slightly too large, so the rifling is weak. Projectile is disarmed: casting is solid iron. Recovered: Spanish Fort, Alabama.
For sale............$850.

A0353...Rifled artillery projectile, Tennessee design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, pattern with, bourreleted ringed short nose, copper disc sabot with 3 studs in the shell flush mounted with short bolt, wood time fuze, Confederate rifle, 3in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured and was originally believed to have been developed by Mullane working with Read and others, however, updated research has not been able to confirm the existence of a man named Mullane. Period literature often refers to work as the "Tennessee" design, cup, or sabot, and is attributed to Captain Lardner Gibbon, although official recognition for his development was never granted. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by studs and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This sabot pattern, referred to as Type I, employed three long studs cast into the shell body fitted through the disc sabot, a short bolt apparently secured the copper disc flush mounted and eliminated the wood dowel used in earlier versions. Performance of this sabot was unsatisfactory, typically the studs or the bolt would break on firing releasing or distorting the copper disc sabot. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough , the casting is crude, and the width and depth of the rings also vary by the depth of the milling. Length of nose varies considerably and is partly the result of how much the nose was milled to accommodate the wood fuze . The nose on this pattern is relatively short and the bourrelet rings are typically strong. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 203.

Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 8in. overall (6.5in. exclude bolt & studs), weight 6.8lbs. Sabot is fired showing weak lands and grooves, and is intact. Wood fuze is partial. Projectile is disarmed: drill hole through paper section of time fuze. Recovered: Virginia campaign.
For sale............$600.

A0427...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell,"common" (standard), high band rabbeted brass band sabot, Parrott percussion fuze, Parrott 10 pounder rifle, 2.9in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Robert Parrott. The sabot system utilized was a thin wide brass band secured to the base with rabbets, referred to as "type II", more flexible than the earlier wrought iron design. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. Use in smaller caliber ordnance was generally abandoned in favor of the thicker type III narrow band sabot. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 9.5lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is a "common" shell, (standard), it does not contain balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Parrott zinc percussion fuze, this one used the "improved" one part design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Bottom of shell usually shows a casting sprue which was rough milled. This is the early 2.9 inch pattern, (most are 3 inch).
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 225.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 8.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 9.2lbs. Sabot is fired showing 3 weak lands and grooves, sabot barely took the rifling. Percussion fuze intact. Metal is solid, minor areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed: drill hole through the side. Recovered: Kennesaw, Georgia.
For sale............$350.

A0534...Artillery projectile, stand of grape, canvass or "quilt" covered, iron balls, 32 pounder, 6.4in. The stand of grape was the artillerist's weapon of last resort. Once the enemy got close to the battery, the gunners would load these rounds, and the flimsy stand would burst on firing sending the contents in scatter fashion against the troops charging the cannon. The fire was devastating against the troops but the enemy would be so close that options to reload and shoot would have been limited. The quilted stand was an early design, the base and post were cast as a unit, three rows of four balls (12 total) were stacked around the post, then covered with canvass and twine, this early design did not have rings or a top. Based on the diameter of this projectile, it is believed that this could be used with any 6.4in. cannon, either 32 pounder smoothbore, or rifled 32 pounder. This pattern was developed well before the Civil War and it is documented that a supply of them was available in the southern arsenals. However close fighting with these large guns seldom occurred, so most of these projectiles were simply discarded.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 99.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.1in., length 9in. (excluding fuze), weight 30lbs. Individual balls will measure 2.875in. approximately, the balls are often irregular. This stand and balls were all found together. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting, never had a bursting charge. Recovered: Kinston, North Carolina by Willie Lewis.
For sale............$1,200.

A0536...Rifled artillery projectile, Read design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with smooth sides, star cavity interior, copper ring sabot milled, copper time fuze, Confederate 3.4in. or Blakely rifle, 3.5in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured during the war. Read developed this copper sabot, it was more flexible than the earlier wrought iron sabot Both sides produced a smooth sided shell, this Confederate version is distinguished by a lathe dimple in the base, a casting sprue on the nose, and the smooth sides were finished by turning on a lathe, nose on this pattern is bluntly rounded. Copper ring sabot is tapered at the top and seated in a deep groove well inside of the iron base, ring was cast thick, then milled to a thin edge at the bottom. Interior of the shell was segmented in star shape, an innovation to produce more even fragmentation. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, two spanner holes, Jones pg. 41. It is not entirely clear what gun this was intended for, specimens noted seem to vary in diameter from 3.35 in to 3.45 inch which may be measurement variance caused by corrosion, distortion of sabots from firing, or machining quality variations. Many were found at High Bridge Virginia which was a low priority outpost and may have been equipped with an older smoothbore gun bored and retrofitted to take these rifled projectiles or it could have been intended for the 12 pounder Blakely rifle, 3.5 inch.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 273.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.5in., length 7.25in. (excluding fuze), weight 11.7lbs. Sabot is fired showing 7 lands and grooves, distortion from firing and is intact, the 7 grooves suggests that this could have been fired from a rifled 6 pounder, 3.67in gun although the size suggests it should have been used in a smaller gun.. Time fuze intact. Metal is solid, minor areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed: drill hole through paper section of time fuze. Recovered: High Bridge, Virginia.
For sale
............$800.

A0565...Rifled artillery projectile, Broun design, Confederate manufacture, bursting projectile, long pattern with single bourrelet ring, copper band sabot, wood time fuze, Confederate rifle, 3in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following William Broun's design. The sabot system utilized was a thin copper band sabot, notched into the base of the projectile. This pattern projectile with a rounded nose, utilized a wide bourrelet band at the top, the sabot was slightly larger than the rest of the projectile and served as a second bourrelet, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough. A lathe dimple in the base, and a casting sprue on the nose are usually noted. This pattern was produced late in the war as iron was in short supply, recycled material was often used and the metal quality of these projectiles is almost always poor. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 133.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.95in., length 8.0in., excluding the fuze, weight 9.4lbs. Sabot is unifired. Wood fuze is missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: not determuined.
For sale............$500.

A0646... / A0647. Confederate platform torpedo, and 18 inch ball used to anchor frame torpedo.

Although contemporary accounts describe these as "torpedoes" these devices were completely immobile. The "frame torpedo" was mounted on a platform in the shipping lane and depended on a ship to hit it. Note that the device was made in two parts, the seam around the middle was threaded and assembled on arming. This presumably would create a point of weakness, forcing the charge to blow upward to inflict maximum damage on the ship's bottom. The fuze is a pressure sensitive fuze, and this is smashed. Two of the bolts used to fasten the device to the platform are present, both are bent. There is a side hole filled with an iron bolt, and sealed with a leather washer, this may have been used to fill the device once the fuze was installed. When the iron bolt was first loosened it revealed that the torpedo was completely empty inside. The torpedo field was cleared after capture by the Federals, and this example was found on the banks near the field. It had probably been pulled from the platform, this might explain the bent bolts and the smashed fuze, then abandoned. The rest of the torpedoes were apparently recovered and most were taken to West Point for analysis, where they reside today. This torpedo field was located near Chapins Bluff on the James River and both the frame torpedo and an 18 inch ball were recovered together on the banks near this bluff. The report of its capture and a schematic drawing are both published in the "Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies", Series I, Volume 7 pg. 543. The schematic shows a line of 36 frame torpedoes, followed by a line of 36 floating torpedoes, the latter was tethered to 18 inch balls used as anchors. The 18 inch ball is made as a typical cannon ball, open cavity and tapered hole. There was no effort to develop a cannon or a mortar of this caliber, this seems strange design for an anchor, but it would have been relatively easy to manufacture and get into the field quickly. The report clearly shows that 18 inch balls were used to anchor the line of floating torpedoes. Possibly this one was pulled from the torpedo field with force, then abandoned, most of the floating and the frame torpedoes were taken to West Point Foundry where they were disassembled and analyzed, and most are still there today.
Torpedo measures: length 24in., body width 12in., 400 lbs estimated. Ball is 18inch diameter, 250lbs estimated.

Reference: "Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies", Series I, Volume 7 pg. 543.
Reference: "Torpedoes, Another Look at the Infernal machines of the Civil War", by Michael P Kochan, and John C Wideman,page 52., actual item photographed.
Reference: Artillery Fuses of the Civil War, by Charles H Jones, page 132., actual example photographed.
For sale..........Sold.

A0648...Rifled artillery projectile, Brooke design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, bourreleted ringed long pattern, copper ratchet disc sabot, Confederate watercap time fuze, Brooke rifle, 7in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following John Brooke's design. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by ratchet ribs cast into both the heavy sabot and shell body, and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough. Fuze employed was a Confederate Naval watercap time fuze, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 19.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 188.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 16.25in. (excluding fuze), weight 99lbs. Sabot is unfired. Confederate watercap fuze is missing, sleeve remains. Metal quality is solid. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: cache found Pee Dee River near Cheraw, SC, site where Confederate gunboat was scuttled.
For sale............$2,000.

A0657...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, thick walled, Army use, wood fuze, Rodman smoothbore gun, 15in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals for the 15 inch Rodman, the heaviest of the smoothbores, this was the army version intended to be used in land forts in defense of Washington and Fort Monroe but no credible Confederate attack ever threatened either of these forts. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place
Reference: Bell , Heavy Ordnance, pg. 85.

Projectile measures: diameter 14.85in., weighs about 330 pounds. Wood fuze is missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: surplus stocks.
For sale.............Sold.

A0678...Rifled artillery projectile, Brooke design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, smooth sided pattern, copper ratchet disc sabot, copper percussion fuze, Brooke rifle, 7in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following John Brooke's design. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by ratchet ribs cast into both the heavy sabot and shell body, and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. Shell is smooth sided and relatively short, this late design was likely originally intended for the rifled 42 pounders. Sides of shell are smooth, appearance of a sleeve depends on the degree of milling near the nose. Sabot is marked "BROOKE" in the bottom. Fuze employed was a copper percussion fuze, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 52 and sequence.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 186.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in. (excluding fuze), weight 93lbs. Sabot is unfired. Fuze was not installed or has been removed. Metal quality is very strong, shell may be nondug. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: not known.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 186., actual example photographed
For sale............$3,500.

A0679...Rifled artillery projectile, Brooke design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, short pattern with bourrelet rings, thin upper ring, and flat nose, ratchet disc sabot, Confederate Brooke rifle, 7in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following John Brooke's design. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by ratchet ribs cast into both the heavy sabot and shell body, and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough. The top is only slightly rounded, this flat top was designed to deliver maximum impact against the Federal ironclads. This short bolt was intended for the new rifled Brooke rifles and used in the Mobile Bay campaign, the upper bourrelet ring is cast narrow.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 180.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 11.75in. (excluding fuze), weight 97lbs. Heavy copper disc sabot is unfired and intact, dings on the bottom of the sabot are foundry marks. Metal solid, minor pitting only. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Mobile Bay Alabama.
For sale............$2,000.

A0718...Rifled artillery projectile, Read design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with smooth sides wrought iron sabot, experimental blind shell not fuzed, rifled 32 pounder gun, 6.4in. Projectile was an experimental pattern developed before the war employing John Read's design. This pattern has smooth sides, The sabot system utilized was a wrought iron ring. This was apparently used as an experimental round, it was never drilled for a fuze, and interior cavity contains mostly foundry casting sand.
Reference: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 346.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.36in., length 9.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 47lbs. Wrought iron sabot intact. Blind shell there is hole for a fuze but it was never drilled or fitted with a fuze, this may have been used as a test round. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: not known
For sale............$1,800.

A0754...Rifled artillery projectile, Sawyer design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, lead sabot with lead sleeve, smooth sided, Sawyer rifle, 3.67 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals, following the design of Addison M Sawyer. The sabot system was designed with a massive lead sabot covering the entire base and the sides. The design apparently proved unsatisfactory because the excessive lead consumed would gum up the bore on the cannon, and the elasticity of the lead probably lessened the dispersion of fragments, it was tested at Port Hudson, and then apparently abandoned. This pattern was cast without flanges, bottom is tapered, sides are smooth. Base is stamped "PATENTED NOVEMBER 13, 1855". Sabot if fired will show six weak lands and grooves, a pattern unique to the Sawyer rifle. The massive lead sabot tended to soften or melt in firing, hence the rifling is usually obscured.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 294.

Projectile measures: diameter 3. 6in., length 7in., weight 15.6lbs. Lead sabot is fired, and shows 6 lands and grooves and distortion from firing. Patent date in base is partly readable. Projectile is disarmed, casting is solid iron. Recovered: Port Hudson, Louisiana.
For sale............ $750.

A0761...Rifled artillery projectile, Confederate adaptation of Parrott sabot design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, long pattern with bourrelet rings and blunt nose, Confederate Brooke rifle, 7in.Projectile was Confederate manufactured following design features from the bolts with bourrelet rings and blunt nose, but adapting the Parrott designed sabot system. The bolt with slightly rounded blunt nose and bourrelet rings was a design intended to challenge the Federal ironclad, and this body design was employed on several patterns by Brooke, Tennessee, and Broun. The sabot system is virtually identical to the Parrott high band notched system, flat bottom, nearly squared notches along the outer edge, with a high band ring sabot. So far none of these shells have been recovered with the band sabot intact, but the notching size and shape is very close to the high band sabots used on Parrott 100 pounders.
Reference: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 304.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 12.5in. (no sabot), weight 101lbs. High band sabot separated on firing and is missing, there are no known examples with sabot. Metal stable, projectile was recovered from wet ground and has been conserved. Projectile is disarmed, solid casting never had a cavity or a bursting charge. Recovered: Charleston, South Carolina, "Long Island", which is near Folly Beach.
For sale............$1,800.

A0845...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, thick walled, single fuzed Navy watercap time fuze, Rodman smoothbore gun, 15 in., fuze is dated 1862 Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals for the 15 inch Rodman, the heaviest of the smoothbores, and was used as the main gun on the monitor class of ironclads. There were several of them built, these ships with their ironclad protection would move close to the target delivering these heavy balls to degrade the dug in defending fortifications. Fuze employed was a single Federal Navy watercap fuze , "ORD. D (anchor) / (date) " , Jones pg. 10 .
Reference: Bell , Heavy Ordnance, pg. 87.

Projectile measures: diameter 14.85in., weighs about 330 pounds.Watercap fuze is dated 1862 and is removable, it is probably a replacement but is correct for this shell. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes the empty interior. Recovered: surplus stocks.
For sale..............Sold.

A1033...Rifled artillery projectile, Harding design, Confederate manufacture, hollow shot bolt, copper ring sabot, Confederate rifled 32 pounder, 6.4in. Projectile is Confederate manufacture, apparently following the design of "Harding", although at this point we really do not know who this designer was. The Harding sabot is very similar to the Federal Parrott sabots, it is a copper ring cast onto the shell and secured by notches. Shells are short and appear to have been manufactured for use in 32 pounder smoothbores, reconditioned and banded with rifling. Bolt has smooth sides, a hollow core perhaps to achieve greater velocity in short range engagements, flat nose. The inner core, usually left empty, was plugged with a threaded plug on the bottom. All recoveries have been from Charleston, South Carolina, attack of the Dia Ching in January 1865.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 228.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.3in., length 11.5in., weight 49lbs, approximate (core is hollow). Sabot is fired, showing 13 lands and grooves and is intact. Projectile recovered from wet ground and has been treated. Projectile is disarmed, cavity is hollow and never held explosive charge. Recovered: Charleston South Carolina.
For sale............$2,000.

A1038...Rifled artillery projectile, Read design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with smooth sides short segmented interior, wrought iron sabot, wood time fuze, Confederate rifle 3.4 in. or Blakely rifle 3.5 in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured during the war. Read developed this copper sabot, it was more flexible than the earlier wrought iron sabot Both sides produced a smooth sided shell, this Confederate version is distinguished by a lathe dimple in the base, a casting sprue on the nose, and the smooth sides were finished by turning on a lathe, nose on this pattern is bluntly rounded. Copper ring sabot is tapered at the top and seated in a deep groove well inside of the iron base, ring was cast thick, then milled to a thin edge at the bottom. Interior of the shell was segmented in star shape, an innovation to produce more even fragmentation. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place. It is not entirely clear what gun this was intended for, specimens noted seem to vary in diameter from 3.35 in to 3.45 inch which may be measurement variance caused by corrosion, distortion of sabots from firing, or machining quality variations.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 272.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.3in., length 6.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 7.5lb. Wrought iron sabot intact, showing distortion from firing. Wood fuze is partial. Metal quality solid with areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: not determined.
For sale............ $750.

A1095...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern "common" (standard), high band brass ring sabot, Parrott "improved one part" percussion fuze, Parrott 20 pounder rifle, 3.67in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Robert Parrott. The sabot system utilized was a thin wide brass band secured to the base with rabbets, referred to as "type II", more flexible than the earlier wrought iron design. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. Use in smaller caliber ordnance was generally abandoned in favor of the thicker type III narrow band sabot. Some of these shells were configured as case shot, (approx. 17.5lbs to 19lbs. with balls, short, 9.25in.), or as "common" (approx 15lbs. to 17lbs. without balls, long 10.25in.). This shell is a "common" shell, (standard), it does not contain balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Parrott zinc "improved" one part design, with a flange, (Jones, Fuzes, pg. 81), edge of the fuze hole is milled flat. Bottom of shell usually shows a casting sprue which was rough milled.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), not listed, sabot style shown for 30 pounder Bell pg. 278.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.6in., length 10.25in. (excluding fuze), weight 16.7lbs. High band sabot is not fired. Threaded for fuze, missing. Metal quality, solid. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: surplus stocks.
For sale............ $300.

A1130...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, "chill nose" pattern, narrow ring brass sabot, Parrott 20 pounder rifle, 3.67in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Robert Parrott. The sabot system utilized was a narrow brass ring secured to the base with internal rabbets, referred to as "type III", more flexible than wrought iron and more narrow than the high band, this took the rifling much better than the earlier designs. Shell is solid casting, or "bolt" and was designed to be used against opposing cannon by striking the equipment, use of this light bolt had limited applicability and is relatively scarce in the smaller calibers. The blunt nose of this bolt was hardened by "chilling", a process of rapid cooling after casting, and was tapered to a smaller diameter in order to concentrate the force on impact. Bottom of shell usually shows a casting sprue which was rough milled, there will often be casting flaws near the base. Projectile measures: diameter 3.66in., length 8.75in. (excluding fuze), weight 19.8lbs. Sabot is fired showing 5 lands and grooves, and is intact. Metal strong, areas of light pitting.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 230.

Projectile is disarmed: solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Port Hudson, Louisiana, by Emile Mancuso.
For sale............ $300.....

A1141...Rifled artillery projectile, Sawyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, lead sabot with lead sleeve and pre-cast flanges, Sawyer combination fuze, Sawyer rifle, 3.67 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals, following the design of Addison M Sawyer. The sabot system was designed with a massive lead sabot covering the entire base and the sides. The design apparently proved unsatisfactory because the excessive lead consumed would gum up the bore on the cannon, and the elasticity of the lead probably lessened the dispersion of fragments, it was tested at Port Hudson, and then apparently abandoned. This pattern was cast six flanges cast into the shell. Base is stamped "PATENTED NOVEMBER 13, 1855". Fuze employed was .the Sawyer percussion fuze, Jones pg. 33. PSabot if fired will show six weak lands and grooves, a pattern unique to the Sawyer rifle.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 296.
A1141E.jpg (26435 bytes) A1141F.jpg (42854 bytes)
Projectile measures: diameter 3.6in. approx, length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 11.6lbs. Lead sabot is fired, rifled 6 lands and grooves is strong, part of sabot peeled off around the nose. Patent date in base is readable. Fuze is partial, top is missing, inner cap is exposed. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the side. Recovered: Port Hudson, Louisiana, by Emile Mancusco.
For sale............ $1,200.

A1144...Hand grenade, Ketchum design, elongated projectile with taper at both ends, wood and paper guiding tail, percussion fuze with disc cup plunger, "3 pounds", 2.4 in.
Projectile followed the design of William Ketchum. This projectile was designed to be used in trench warfare, it was to be tossed by hand, a wood tail with paper fins would give it stability in flight, a plunger was affixed to the front end that was meant to detonate it by compressing a percussion cap. In order for the detonation to work, the projectile needed to land perfectly flat on the plunger, most did not, and so they were frequently caught in a blanket or picked up and tossed back and forth doing little actual damage.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 497.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.4in., length 4.5in. Plunger intact, wooden tail and fin are missing. Projectile is disarmed, tail end is open exposing empty interior. Recovered: Port Hudson, Louisiana,by Emile Manscusco.
For sale............ $850.

A1149...Rifled artillery projectile, Schenkl design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), short pattern with grooved tail, paper sleeve sabot, Schenkl percussion fuze, rifled 6 pounder smoothbore, 3.67 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals, following the design of John P. Schenkl. The sabot system consisted of a "forcing cone" paper sleeve, which was intended to expand into the rifling, then flutter away on release. Problems with the paper absorbing moisture or swelling and blocking passage of the flame on firing rendered it impractical with time fuzes and so it saw limited application. This short pattern was intended for the rifled six pounder and has six grooved ribs to secure the sabot. Usually this pattern is a "common" or standard round and will not be filled with balls , and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Schenkl Army percussion fuze , removable cap had a slider and percussion cap, head is 1.22in.or 1.25in., 10 threads per inch, marked "JP SCHENKL / PAT OCT 16 1861", Jones pg. 98 or 99., top of the fuze hole is milled flat.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 307.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.6in., length 8.5in. (excluding the fuze), weight 10.4.lbs. Schenkl percussion fuze is intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the side. Recovered: Port Hudson, Louisiana, by Emile Mancuso.
For sale............ $550.

A1162...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", thin walled, Bormann time fuze, Dahlgren smoothbore gun, 9 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals for the Navy for the heavy Dahlgren gun. This was a heavy smoothbore gun designed for the Federal river gunships. This pattern was filled with case shot balls and was intended for close combat, or ships against troops, however it was unusual for the these heavy guns to be engaged in this manner. Fuze employed was a Bormann long range time fuze, unlike smaller caliber balls, the threaded throat does not have an inner ledge for the fuze to rest, the inner plug is the same diameter;as the fuze and simply preceded it into the fuze hole, (Jones pg. 24).
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 69.

Projectile measures: diameter 8.9in., weight 69lbs. Bormann fuze is intact. Based on weight it appears that case shot balls may not have been loaded into this shell, the fuze is original. These shells had little practical use and are rare. Projectile is disarmed by drill hole though the bottom. Recovered: Port Hudson Louisiana, by Emile Mancuso.
For sale............$900.

A1202...Rifled artillery projectile, Broun design, Confederate manufacture, bursting projectile with segmented interior, long pattern with single bourrelet ring, copper band sabot, wood time fuze, Confederate rifle, 3in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following William Broun.'s design. The sabot system utilized was a thin copper band sabot, notched into the base of the projectile. This pattern projectile with a rounded nose, utilized a wide bourrelet band at the top, the sabot was slightly larger than the rest of the projectile and served as a second bourrelet, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough. Interior cavity was cast with segmented grooves, an attempt to facilitate better fragmentation. A lathe dimple in the base, and a casting sprue on the nose are usually noted. This pattern was produced late in the war as iron was in short supply, recycled material was often used and the metal quality of these projectiles is almost always poor. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 134.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.95in., length 7.5in., excluding the fuze, weight 8 to 9lbs., weight not determined. Copper band sabot was separated on firing and is missing. Wood fuze is missing. projectile has been cut exposing the segmented interior. projectile is disarmed, cut projectile exposes interior. Recovered Mississippi campaign.
For sale............ Cut projectile, half.....$200.

A1211...Rifled artillery projectile, Britten design, English manufacture, solid bolt, pattern with short tapered nose, lead cup sabot, 10 pounder rifle, 2.9 in. or Ordnance rifle, 3in. Projectile was manufactured by the English and exported to the American conflict, either side could purchase them, but primary use was southern. The design follows Britten's English patent, employing a lead cup sabot with a counter bulge or large concave teat that extends beyond the bottom. Bolt was turned on a lathe, when sabot is missing there is lathe dimple and lathe marks on bottom, some will have ring around the nose which probably was left from it being clamped to the lathe, American producers tended to use knobs.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 109.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.86in., length 5.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 7.0lb. Fired sabot shows 7 lands & grooves, which means it was fired from 3 in. ordnance gun, sabot intact with distortion from firing, shell cart-wheeled and landed bottom first. All known examples have come from Helena Arkansas, apparently fired from a Federal battery, it is possible that in that theater, remote at the time, that the Federals captured Confederate supplies and used them! Metal is solid. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Helena Arkansas.
For sale............ $950.

A1216...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, Confederate incendiary, Confederate incendiary fuze, smoothbore, 8in. This was a Confederate innovation, an attempt to create a shell that would spread fire once delivered to the target. The bursting charge was contained in an inner can, the cavity was filled with a liquid incendiary mixture. The inner fuze is a captured Navy watercap fuze. There are two spanner holes, the other holes are drilled through the entire fuze. There would have been an outer covering, now missing.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 58.

Projectile measures: diameter 7.9in., weight 45lbs.Confederate incendiary fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes the empty interior. Recovered: James River siege lines below Richmond, Virginia.
For sale............$1,000.

A1222...Rifled artillery projectile, Schenkl design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), short pattern with ribbed tail, paper sleeve sabot, Schenkl percussion fuze, rifled 6 pounder smoothbore, 3.67 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals, following the design of John P. Schenkl. The sabot system consisted of a "forcing cone" paper sleeve, which was intended to expand into the rifling, then flutter away on release. Problems with the paper absorbing moisture or swelling and blocking passage of the flame on firing rendered it impractical with time fuzes and so it saw limited application. This short pattern was intended for the rifled six pounder and has six raised ribs to secure the sabot. Usually this pattern is a "common" or standard round and will not be filled with balls , and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Schenkl Army percussion fuze , removable cap had a slider and percussion cap, head is 1.22in.or 1.25in., 10 threads per inch, marked "JP SCHENKL / PAT OCT 16 1861", (Jones pg. 9 8 or 99). , top of the fuze hole is milled flat.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 308.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.6in., length 8.5in. (excluding the fuze), weight 10.2.lbs. Schenkl percussion fuze is removable. Projectile has been disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Port Hudson, Louisiana, by Michael J Cherry Sr.
For sale............ $600.

A1225...Rifled artillery projectile, Brooke design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, short pattern with bourrelet rings, wide upper ring, and flat nose, ratchet disc sabot, Confederate Brooke rifle, 7in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following John Brooke's design. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by ratchet ribs cast into both the heavy sabot and shell body, and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough. The top is only slightly rounded, this flat top was designed to deliver maximum impact against the Federal ironclads. This short bolt was intended for the new rifled Brooke rifles and used in the Charleston campaign, the upper bourrelet ring is cast wide.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.95in., length 12in., weight 98lbs, shell body is 90lbs, sabot is 8lbs. Sabot is fired showing 10 lands and grooves, sabot was found with the shell, sabot bolt is partial, head did not survive restoration, sabot lifts on and off the shell over the bolt, showing ratchet grooves on both the shell body and the sabot. Metal is stable, projectile was recovered from wet ground and has been conserved. Projectile is disarmed: solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Charleston, South Carolina.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 179.
For sale............ $1,500.

A1227...Rifled artillery projectile, Harding design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, Girardey wood percussion fuze, copper ring sabot, Confederate rifled 42 pounder, 7in. Projectile is Confederate manufacture, apparently following the design of "Harding", although at this point we really do not know who this designer was. The Harding sabot is very similar to the Federal Parrott sabots, it is a copper ring cast onto the shell and secured by notches. Shells are short and appear to have been manufactured for use in 42 pounder smoothbores, reconditioned and banded with rifling. Bolt has smooth sides, pointed nose. Fuze employed was a wood sleeved Girardey percussion fuze, Jones pg. 66, usually only the wood sleeve is recovered. All recoveries have been from Charleston, South Carolina.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 231.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.8in., length 11.4in., weight 57.6lbs. Sabot is fired, showing 10 lands and grooves and is intact. Fuze is remnant. Projectile recovered from wet ground and has been treated. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the open section of the fuze. Recovered: Charleston South Carolina, bombardment of Long Island.
For sale............$2,000.

A1237...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, Navy watercap time fuze, Federal Dahlgren, 11 in., fuze is dated 1862. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals for the Navy for the heavy Dahlgren gun. This was a heavy smoothbore gun designed for the monitor class of Federal river gunships, this was one of two guns mounted in the turret. Projectile is threaded for a Federal Navy watercap fuze, markings, "ORD. D (anchor) / (date)", Jones pg. 10.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 77.

Projectile measures: diameter 10.9in., weight 125lbs. Watercap fuze is removable, dated 1862. Projectile is disarmed, removable fuze exposes empty interior. Recovered: Port Hudson, Louisiana.
For sale............$800.

A1239...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, Navy watercap time fuze, Federal Dahlgren, 9 in., fuze is dated 1859. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals for the Navy for the heavy Dahlgren gun. This was a heavy smoothbore gun designed for the monitor class of Federal river gunships, this was one of two guns mounted in the turret. Projectile is threaded for a Federal Navy watercap fuze, markings, "ORD. D (anchor) / (date)", Jones pg. 10.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 61.

Projectile measures: diameter 8.9in., weight 68lbs. Orignial fuze is intact, dated 1859. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the bottom. Recovered: Port Hudson, Louisiana.
For sale............$650.

A1278...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, high band brass sabot, Parrott 300 pounder rifle, 10in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Bottom is plugged with a rivet protruding from the bottom. The shell was cast with an open hole in the base, through which a rod was placed to hold the core during casting. After casting the rod was removed, the rod was removed and replaced with a drive in plug, this while the casting was still hot. On cooling the hole would shrink thus securing the bottom plug. This is the largest Parrott shell made, 300 pounder Parrott. Fuze employed was Parrott large time fuze, (Jones pg. tbd).
Reference: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 318.

Projectile measures: diameter 9.9in., length 22.5in., weight 250lbs. approx. with sabot. High band sabot is not fired. Threaded fuze is missing. Metal is solid, crack on side is from freezing, projectile set outside in the north, filled with water, froze and cracked, it is stable. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes the empty interior. Recovered: shell was used as a war trophy in a public building in Boston Massachusetts, until de-accessioned, however, these 10in. projectiles were used in the siege of Charleston South Carolina.
For sale................Sold.

A1283...Rifled artillery projectile, Tennessee design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, pattern with, bourreleted ringed long nose, copper disc sabot with 3 studs in the shell and long bolt, wood time fuze, Confederate rifle, 3in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured and was originally believed to have been developed by Mullane working with Read and others, however, updated research has not been able to confirm the existence of a man named Mullane. Period literature often refers to work as the "Tennessee" design, cup, or sabot, and is attributed to Captain Lardner Gibbon, although official recognition for his development was never granted. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by studs and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This sabot pattern, referred to as Type I, employed three long studs cast into the shell body fitted through the disc sabot, a long bolt apparently secured the copper disc along with a wood dowel. Performance of this sabot was unsatisfactory, typically the studs or the bolt would break on firing releasing or distorting the copper disc sabot. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough , the casting is crude, and the width and depth of the rings also vary by the depth of the milling. Length of nose varies considerably and is partly the result of how much the nose was milled to accommodate the wood fuze . The nose on this pattern is relatively long and the bourrelet rings are typically weak. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 203.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 9.0 in. overall, body only 7.0in. excluding bolt & studs, weight 7.0lb. Sabot is fired showing 3 lands and grooves, and is intact but shows distortion from firing. Wood fuze is partial, smooth tapered hole. Metal is solid, minor areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed: drill hole through paper section of time fuze. Recovered: Fredericksburg, Virginia.
For sale............ $600.

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Shipping of artillery shells and my show schedule:
Shipping shells almost anywhere is not a problem. UPS accepts packages up to 150 pounds, this will take care of most shells below 8 inch Parrotts and 13 inch round balls. Heavier than that requires common carrier. I charge shipping at estimated commercial cost. I attend some shows and I can deliver any shell to a show to be picked up at no charge. However, please understand that I only bring a small sampling of shells to sit on my table at a show, these things are heavy to haul in and out of a show, and so most shells I bring to a show are making a one way trip. So while I may have many shells on my webpage, I typically bring only a limited sampling to the shows. So if you see a shell you want, please tell me you want it before I leave for a show, and I can bring it for you or work a layaway with final payment to be made at the show.

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