Civil War Relicman,
Harry Ridgeway

Winchester, Virginia USA, changed hands 70 times in the Civil War!
authentic Civil War relics, bought and sold
.
relicman.com.

Civil War artillery, Relicman sales catalog. , page 2.
Page two, items for sale, please refer to Relicman stock number when ordering, item numbers A1500 to end.

All items listed are authentic to the Civil War or as otherwise described.
All artillery items listed have been disarmed.
Any excavated relics have been recovered from private property with owners permission.


A1524...Rifled artillery projectile, Britten design, English manufacture, bursting shell, pattern with short tapered nose segmented interior, lead cup sabot, Britten percussion fuze, Blakely rifle 3.5 in. Projectile was manufactured by the English and exported to the American conflict, either side could purchase them, but primary use was southern. The design follows Britten's English patent, employing a lead cup sabot with a counter bulge or large concave teat that extends beyond the bottom. There is a ring around the nose which probably was left from it being clamped to the lathe, American producers tended to use knobs. Interior is segmented to provide points of weakness for maximum fragmentation. It appears that the segmented interior, which is hardened steel, may have initially been manufactured as rolled sheet, then bent into a cylinder forming the core, then an iron skin cast onto the cylinder, the casting is thin on the bottom covered only by the lead cup sabot. Fuze hole is left hand threaded for a Britten percussion fuze, the domed fuze was highly advanced at the time, (Jones, Fuzes, Pg 72).
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 117.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.4in., length 6.25in. (excluding fuze), weight 12.3lb. Fired sabot shows 7 lands & grooves, and is intact. Percussion fuze intact. Metal is solid. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the side. Recovered: Seven Days Battle, Virginia campaign.
For sale............ Sold.

A1528...Rifled artillery projectile, Read design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, short pattern with rounded nose and bourrelet rings, thick copper ring sabot, Confederate rifle, 3in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured during the war employing John Read's design, probably at Selma Arsenal. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough. The nose is relatively rounded, and the width of the bourrelet rings varies considerably, presumably this is operator variance in the finishing process. A lathe dimple in the base, and a casting sprue on the nose are usually prominent. Read developed this copper ring sabot, it was more flexible than the earlier wrought iron sabot, sabot is tapered at the top and seated in a deep groove well inside of the iron base. Copper ring sabot was cast thick and not milled, this was entirely too stiff to take the rifling. Shell is rounded nose bolt with no explosive charge, for use against enemy cannon. Upper bourrelet ring is usually stamped "14", meaning is not known.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 252
.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.96in., length 6.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 8.2lb. Thick brass band sabot unfired. Metal solid, sabot intact, mark "14" is crisp. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting without cavity. Recovered: Snyder's Bluff Mississippi ammo dump.
For sale............ Sold.

A1530...Rifled artillery projectile, Archer design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, short pattern with short nose and long tapered base, lead band sabot, Confederate rifle, 3 in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following the general designs of Junius Archer. A lead band sabot was cast onto the projectile secured by concentric grooves cast into the base of the shell. This pattern has two deep angled grooves, sabot extended to bottom groove leaving a long tapered knob on the base. Production of this pattern was limited, it appears to have been experimental and development moved to patterns with longer noses and shorter bases.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 74.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.0in., length 6.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 6.8lb. Fired sabot shows rifling and distortion and is intact. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed: solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Remington, Virginia.
For sale............ $850.

A1531...Rifled artillery projectile, Sawyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, lead sabot with lead sleeve, smooth sided, Sawyer combination fuze, Sawyer rifle, 3.67 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals, following the design of Addison M Sawyer. The sabot system was designed with a massive lead sabot covering the entire base and the sides. The design apparently proved unsatisfactory because the excessive lead consumed would gum up the bore on the cannon, and the elasticity of the lead probably lessened the dispersion of fragments, it was tested at Port Hudson, and then apparently abandoned. This pattern was cast without flanges, base is tapered, sides are smooth. Base is stamped "PATENTED NOVEMBER 13, 1855" and number "14 1/2" is stamped near the nose. Fuze employed was the Sawyer combination fuze, sometimes referred to as the "candlestick" fuze, Jones pg. 34. Sabot if fired will show six weak lands and grooves, a pattern unique to the Sawyer rifle. The massive lead sabot tended to soften or melt in firing, hence the rifling is usually obscured.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 295.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.58in., length 7.6in., weight 13.9lbs. Lead sabot is fired, rifled 6 lands and grooves is strong, part of sabot peeled off around the nose. Patent date in base is readable and number stamped on nose. Fuze is partial. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the center section of the fuze. Recovered: Port Hudson, Louisiana.
For sale............ $1,200.

A1557...Rifled artillery projectile, James design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), open base with slots, lead and tin sleeve sabot, James percussion fuze, James 14 pounder rifle, 3.8in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Charles James. The pattern utilized a hollow caged cavity (called a "birdcage") covered by a thin sleeve of lead, tin, and canvass, the thin sabot would expand into the rifling, and then be discharged after the projectile left the bore. This meant that there would always be flying metal debris from the sabot, which could be a problem for forward troops. Four small holes were drilled into the base, these are thought to have been vent holes, however they are often lead filled. Shell is common shot (does not contain balls) and with percussion fuze was was designed to be used against opposing cannon by striking the equipment. Fuze employed was the James brass anvil percussion fuze, "West Point" two part fuze, Jones pg. 30.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 188.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.7in., length 6.75in., weight 10.9lb. with sabot. Lead sleeve sabot un-fired. West Point percussion fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the bottom. Recovered: Shiloh, Tennessee.
For sale............ $950.

A1560...Rifled artillery projectile, James design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), open base with slots, lead and tin sleeve sabot, tie ring base, James percussion fuze, James 14 pounder rifle, 3.8in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Charles James. The pattern utilized a hollow caged cavity (called a "birdcage") covered by a thin sleeve of lead , tin , and canvass, the thin sabot would expand into the rifling, and then be discharged after the projectile left the bore. This meant that there always be flying metal debris which could be a problem for forward troops . Four small holes were drilled into the base, these are thought to have been vent holes, however they are often lead filled. A ring around the base was originally installed to hold an iron cup, however it appears the iron cup may not have been used and the tie ring either was abandoned or used to secure the powder bag. Shell is common shot (does not contain balls) and with percussion fuze was designed to be used against opposing cannon by striking the equipment . Fuze employed was the James brass anvil percussion fuze, "West Point" two part fuze, Jones pg. 30 .
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 189.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.7in., length 6.75in. weight 12.3lb., with sabot. Lead sleeve sabot is un-fired. West Point percussion fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the bottom. Recovered: Shiloh, Tennessee.
For sale............ $900.

A1583...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern "case shot" balls packed in sulfur matrix, wrought iron sabot, Parrott time fuze with a flange, Parrott 20 pounder rifle, 3.67in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the prewar invention of Robert Parrott and John Read working together. The sabot system utilized was a wrought iron ring, referred to as the "Type I" sabot, rifling was precast with five flanges, because it was too stiff to take the rifling otherwise. Some of these shells were configured as case shot, (approx. 17.5lbs to 19lbs. with balls, short, 9.25in.), or as "common" (approx 15lbs. to 17lbs. without balls, long 10.25in.). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead case shot balls are packed in yellow or sulfur matrix. Fuze employed was a Parrott zinc time fuze, typically the pattern with a flat flange, (Jones pg. 77)., top of the fuze hole is milled wide to seat the flange. Bottom of shell usually shows a casting sprue which was rough milled.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 219.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.62in., length 9.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 17.6lb. Wrought iron sabot shows five precast rifled lands and grooves. Parrott time fuze is partial. Metal is solid, Shell is disarmed by drill hole through the paper section of the fuze. Recovered: Port Hudson, Louisiana.
For sale............ $275.

A1591...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern "common" (standard), wrought iron sabot, Schenkl percussion fuze, Parrott 20 pounder rifle, 3.67in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the prewar invention of Robert Parrott and John Read working together. The sabot system utilized was a wrought iron ring, referred to as the "Type I" sabot, rifling was precast with five flanges, because it was too stiff to take the rifling otherwise. Some of these shells were configured as case shot, (approx. 17.5lbs to 19lbs. with balls, short, 9.25in.), or as "common" (approx 15lbs. to 17lbs. without balls, long 10.25in.). This shell is a "common" shell, (standard), it does not contain balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Schenkl Army percussion fuze, removable cap had a slider and percussion cap, head is 1.22in.or 1.25in., 10 threads per inch, marked "JP SCHENKL / PAT OCT 16 1861", (Jones pg. 98 or 99)., top of the fuze hole is milled flat. Bottom of shell usually shows a casting sprue which was rough milled.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 219.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.62in., length 10.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 15.8lb. Wrought iron sabot shows five precast rifled lands and grooves. Schenkl percussion fuze fully intact. Metal is solid. Shell is disarmed by drill hole through the side. Recovered: Port Hudson, Louisiana.
For sale............ $375.

A1631...Rifled artillery projectile, Hotchkiss design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, pattern without flame grooves, pointed nose with deep hollow cup , lead band sabot, James 14 pounder rifle, 3.8in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Andrew Hotchkiss. The pattern consisted of three parts, a nose section containing the explosive charge, a cast iron cup fitted on the bottom, and lead band sabot cast around the middle, on firing the cup would compress the lead band sabot expanding it into the rifling. Shell is solid casting, or "bolt" and was designed to be used against opposing cannon by striking the equipment, use of this light bolt had limited applicability and is relatively scarce in the smaller calibers. Nose of this pattern is pointed, with a deep cup or hollow area in the lower part of the nose, this was probably an effort to shift the center of gravity forward. Hotchkiss patent date was cast, not stamped, into the base, "HOTCHKISS PATENT OCTOBER 9, 1855 / MAY 14, 1861", and is typically weak.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg.171.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.7in., length 7.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 13.7lb. Lead band sabot shows 15 lands and grooves, fired from James 14 pounder rifle. Projectile is disarmed: casting is solid iron. Recovered: Monet Ferry, Louisiana.
For sale............ $450.

A1644...Rifled artillery projectile, Mullane or Tennessee design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with bourrelet rings, copper disc sabot with 3 studs in the sabot and flush mounted bolt, Archer percussion fuze, Confederate Brooke rifle, 7in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured and is believed to have been developed by Mullane working with Read and others, although Mullane was never granted a patent and period literature often refers to this work as the "Tennessee" design, cup, or sabot. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by studs and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This sabot pattern, referred to as Type II, employed three studs cast into the sabot and fitted into holes cast into the shell body, secured by a bolt in the center. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough, nose is pointed, this pattern is long. Fuze employed was the Archer percussion fuze, Jones pg. 62.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 429.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.95in., length 16in., weight 100lbs. Sabot is not fired and intact. Percussion fuze is intact and is removable. Metal is solid. Projectile is disarmed: open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: James River, Virginia area, near the 1865 battle involving the CSS "Richmond" which after running aground, apparently discharged a number of these heavy shells to lighten up its load to escape the grounding.
For sale.............$2,500.

A1645...Rifled artillery projectile, Brooke design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, long pattern with bourrelet rings and flat nose, ratchet disc sabot, Confederate Brooke rifle, 7in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following John Brooke's design. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by ratchet ribs cast into both the heavy sabot and shell body, and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough. The top is only slightly rounded, this flat top was designed to deliver maximum impact against the Federal ironclads. This long bolt was the heaviest of the Confederate bolts and likely intended for the new rifled Brooke rifles.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 182.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.95in., length14in., weight 120lbs. Heavy copper disc sabot is unfired and intact. Metal solid, some areas of minor pitting. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: James River,Virginia area, near the 1865 battle involving the CSS "Richmond" which after running aground, apparently discharged a number of these heavy shells to lighten up its load to escape the grounding.
For sale............$2,500.

A1646...Rifled artillery projectile, Brooke design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, forged iron smooth sides blunt nose, mill base sabot, Confederate Brooke rifle, 7in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following John Brooke's design. This pattern was an early design, shell was manufactured from rolled or forged steel, later patterns were cast, the rolling seams are clearly visible leaving rough sections. This would produce a harder steel than cast iron, and might have been more effective against the ironclads, however it was probably too labor extensive and expensive to produce, so few were produced. The entire shell is one integral mass, the sabot was milled out of the base. Brooke's later designs employed independent copper sabot systems. Sides were smooth, top has only a slight convex curve, this nearly flat top was designed to deliver maximum impact against the Federal ironclads. Shell is marked "6.94" on the side, which is the diameter, and "S" on the bottom.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 177.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.94in., length 12.5in., weight 120lbs. Heavy milled sabot is unfired and intact. Metal solid, the forging or rolling seams are very visible on both sides and the top, these are crude manufacture flaws and not ground damage. Marks are very visible on this example. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: James River, Virginia area, near the 1865 battle involving the CSS "Richmond" which after running aground, apparently discharged a number of these heavy shells to lighten up its load to escape the grounding.
For sale...............Sold.

A1665...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell , "case shot", Federal Bormann time fuze with wrench double slot, smoothbore 6 pounder, 3.67 in. Projectile was intended for the smoothbore 6 pounder which had been the primary field howitzer in use before the Civil War but was outclassed by the new 12 pounders generally available. The arsenals were stocked with them, most were manufactured before the war and both sides used them but primary use was southern. The exploding balls were equipped with time fuzes designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field, solid shot was generally used against opposing cannon, but one could be substituted for the other as needed. Originally the ball used a wood cup sabot attached to the ball with straps, on firing the straps would break releasing the ball. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 5lbs. with balls), or as "common" (approx 4lbs. with out balls). This ball is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls. This shell is equipped with a Federal manufactured Bormann time fuze, .75 second starting notch, double wrench slots, entire fuze was threaded, (Jones pg. 22).
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 29.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.58in., weight 5.4lbs. Bormann fuze has been punched. Projectile is disarmed by drill hole on the bottom. Recovered: not known.
For sale............ $375.

A1671...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell , "case shot", Confederate Bormann time fuze with wrench single slot, smoothbore 6 pounder, 3.67 in. Projectile was intended for the smoothbore 6 pounder which had been the primary field howitzer in use before the Civil War but was outclassed by the new 12 pounders generally available. The arsenals were stocked with them, most were manufactured before the war and both sides used them but primary use was southern. The exploding balls were equipped with time fuzes designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field, solid shot was generally used against opposing cannon, but one could be substituted for the other as needed. Originally the ball used a wood cup sabot attached to the ball with straps, on firing the straps would break releasing the ball. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 5lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 4lbs. with out balls). This ball is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls. Shell is equipped with a Confederate manufactured Bormann time fuze, .5 second starting notch, single wrench slot, threads omitted from the top of the fuze, theoretically enabling the fuze to be hand tightened, (Jones pg. 2 2 and 26.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 29.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.58in., weight 4 to 5lbs. Bormann fuze punched and burned. Projectile is disarmed by drill hold through the bottom. Recovered: not known.
For sale............ $375....Sale pending.

A1694...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), Confederate Bormann time fuze with wrench single slot, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82in. Projectile was intended for the 24 pounder smoothbore, which was uncommon, not a very practical weapon for field use because of its excessive weight, most were used as flanking guns in the forts or as Coehorn mortars. Ball was e quipped with the Bormann time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Originally the ball used a wood cup sabot attached to the ball with straps, on firing the straps would break releasing the ball. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 20 to 23lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 16 to 18lbs. without balls). This ball is "common" (standard), explosive charge only without balls. Shell is equipped with a Confederate manufactured Bormann time fuze, .5 second starting notch, single wrench slot, threads omitted from the top of the fuze, theoretically enabling the fuze to be hand tightened, (Jones pg. 22 and 26) .
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 47.

Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16.4lb. Bormann fuze intact, punched, some numbers are readable. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the bottom. Recovered: Augusta, Georgia river cache.
For sale............ $425.

A1709...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, thick walled, with lifting ears, drive in seacoast watercap fuze, Columbiad smoothbore, 10 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals for the Columbiad seige gun. This was a heavy smoothbore and the firing subjected the balls to considerable stress, consequently the walls are thick, approximately 3in. at the fuze hole, and the shell is heavier than a mortar. Lifting ears can be on either type of shell. Fuze employed was a drive in seacoast watercap fuze, opening 1.5in. at surface, shell is cast for a smooth tapered fuze hole capable of receiving any type of drive in fuze including a wood fuze, Jones pg. 6.
Reference: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 72.

Projectile measures: diameter 9.85in., weight 105lbs. Seacoast drive in fuze is intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole on the bottom. Recovered: not determined.
For sale............$900.

A1722...Artillery positioning wrench and elevation lever. The iron hex head wrench was used to turn the positioning wheel for the Parrott 100 pounder siege gun, the lever was used to adjust elevation. The 100 pounder was a heavy gun, and the rear wheel was positioned on a circular track. This wrench would be used to turn a bolt at its axle, and thus turn the wheel to adjust the direction of the gun around the arc. The lever would be used to pry the elevation one notch at a time to adjust the range. Aiming and positioning these heavy guns was a major effort. A picture is shown in Ripley book on Artillery showing an example of this cannon with the wheel on the track, page 41 Figure I-50, and a picture of these tools is shown with an 8 inch Columbiad, page 77 Figure IV-10. Picture page 206, Figure X-31 also shows a picture of the wheel and the hex nut, and there is a partial view of the tool.
Reference: Warren Ripley, "Artillery and Ammunition of The Civil War", pg. 41, 77, and 206.
.
Both irons measure: length, 42in. Recovered: Shell Bluff, near Savannah Georgia.
For sale............ $1,500.

A1756...Rifled artillery projectile, Brooke design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, smooth sided pattern with grooves, ratchet ring sabot, Confederate percussion fuze, Confederate Brooke rifle, 7in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following John Brooke's design. The sabot system utilized was a copper ring cast onto the shell body, with ratchet notches to hold it in place. Shell is smooth sided and relatively short, this early design was likely originally intended for the rifled 42 pounders, but that system was quickly abandoned for the heavier 7 inch long guns. Performance was unsatisfactory, the sabot would typically be thrown or base would chip, and development efforts moved to the heavy disc sabot. Sides of shell are smooth, appearance of a sleeve depends on the degree of milling near the nose. Fuze employed was a copper percussion fuze, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 52 and sequence.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 192.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 14.5in., weight 95lbs. Sabot is fired showing 7 lands & grooves, base is chipped, sabot is partial and shows distortion from firing. Fuze sleeve is present but fuze is missing. Metal is solid. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: James River Virginia defenses.
For sale............$2,000.

A1814...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spreading canister, 12 pounder, 4.62 in. canister plates Thin top plate from a canister. Plates measure 4.4in. to 4.5in. the can fitted over the plates, the can fit loosely into the cannon, so the plates will typically measure small.

This plate received extreme pressure from firing and rolled. Recovered: Vicksburg, Mississippi.
For sale............ ....$75.

A1815...Rifled artillery projectile, Hotchkiss design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pattern with flame grooves, rounded nose, "case shot" lead balls packed loose without matrix or with asphalt matrix, iron separator bolt, lead band sabot, Hotchkiss brass time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Andrew Hotchkiss. The pattern consisted of three parts, a nose section containing the explosive charge, a cast iron cup fitted on the bottom, and lead band sabot cast around the middle, on firing the cup would compress the lead band sabot expanding it into the rifling. Some of these shells were "common" or standard rounds, explosive charge only, or "case shot", filled with balls. This is "case shot", with a time fuze it was designed to be used against troops by spreading large volume of fragments and balls over the open field of fighting. Lead balls were packed in sawdust only, early production, or black asphalt matrix, later production. The nose is rounded to accomodate the extra load of balls and the casting in the nose is thin to encourage breakage forward in the nose. There are two chambers in the nose, all of the powder is in the lower chamber, all of the balls are in the upper chamber, there is an iron seperator bolt in the middle, with a hole and a narrow metal channel to allow the flame to pass from the fuze to detonate the powder in the lower chamber. On detonation, the exploding powder in the base was expected to push the seperator bolt and the balls forward and out the weak top section of the nose. The nose was cast as one part, the bottom is solid, the separator bolt apparently was precast and imbedded in the core, then positioned after casting once the core was removed, it is larger than the fuze opening. Three flame grooves added so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze. Fuze employed was a Hotchkiss brass time fuze, with slots and a flange, Jones pg. 87. Hotchkiss patent date was cast, not stamped, into the base, "HOTCHKISS PATENT OCTOBER 9, 1855", and is typically very weak and may have been omitted entirely as the molds wore down or were replaced.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 167.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.98in., length 6.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 8.6lb. Lead band sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Hotchkiss brass time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: not known.
For sale............ $275.

A1833...Rifled artillery projectile, Hotchkiss design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pattern without flame grooves, pointed nose "common" (standard), lead band sabot, Hotchkiss iron percussion "West Point" style fuze, James 14 pounder rifle, 3.8in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Andrew Hotchkiss. The pattern consisted of three parts, a nose section containing the explosive charge, a cast iron cup fitted on the bottom, and lead band sabot cast around the middle, on firing the cup would compress the lead band sabot expanding it into the rifling. Some of these shells were "common" or standard rounds, explosive charge only, or "case shot", filled with balls. This shell is a "common" shell, (standard), it does not contain balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to be used against enemy cannon. The nose section is pointed, containing an open cavity for the explosive charge only, without a separator bolt. Nose section contains a plugged hole centered on the bottom, presumably this hole was used to secure the core on casting, then a plug was installed to seal the bottom. Hotchkiss patent date was cast, not stamped, into the base, "HOTCHKISS PATENT OCTOBER 9, 1855 / MAY 14, 1861 ", and is typically very weak and may have been omitted entirely as the molds wore down or were replaced. Flame grooves were not used on this pattern, with a percussion fuze the flame groove was not needed. Fuze employed was a Hotchkiss iron percussion fuze, "West Point style" which means anvil and slider operated independently, (Jones pg. 92).
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 174.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.7in., length 7.25in. (excluding fuze) unfired sabot, 6.75in. fired sabot compressed, weight 13.2lb. Lead sabot shows faint signs of 15 lands and grooves, fired from James Rifle. Iron percussion fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole in the side. Recovered: Vicksburg, Mississippi.
For sale............ $400.

A1840...Rifled artillery projectile, Schenkl design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot"lead balls packed in asphalt matrix, rounded nose, paper sleeve sabot, Schenkl combination 10 second fuze, late pattern, Ordnance rifle, 3 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals, following the design of John P. Schenkl. The sabot system consisted of a "forcing cone" paper sleeve, which was intended to expand into the rifling, then flutter away on release. Problems with the paper absorbing moisture or swelling and blocking passage of the flame on firing rendered it impractical with time fuzes and so it saw limited application. This pattern with rounded shoulder was designed to hold "case shot" balls, designed to disperse above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead balls of small size, about .54in. diameter, are packed in black or asphalt matrix, with long powder train which often will be off center. Fuze employed was the Schenkl combination fuze, which was a complicated contraption designed to ignite either by time or on impact. This "late" pattern fuze has the percussion mechanism on the side of the fuze and is marked on top "10 SEC", Jones pg. 105.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 299.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 9in. (excluding the fuze), weight 9lbs. Conbination fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the side. Recovered: City Point, Virginia ammo explosion.
For sale............ $450.

A1843...Rifled artillery projectile, Schenkl design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), long pattern, paper sleeve sabot, Schenkl percussion fuze, Parrott 20 pounder rifle, 3.67 in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals, following the design of John P. Schenkl. The sabot system consisted of a "forcing cone" paper sleeve, which was intended to expand into the rifling, then flutter away on release. Problems with the paper absorbing moisture or swelling and blocking passage of the flame on firing rendered it impractical with time fuzes and so it saw limited application. This long pattern was intended for the Parrott 20 pounder and has six grooved ribs to secure the sabot. Usually this pattern is a "common" or standard round and will not be filled with balls , and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Schenkl Army percussion fuze , removable cap had a slider and percussion cap, head is 1.22in.or 1.25in., 10 threads per inch, marked "JP SCHENKL / PAT OCT 16 1861", Jones pg. 98 or 99., top of the fuze hole is milled flat.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 309.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.6in., length 11.6in. (excluding the fuze), weight 15.2lbs. Schenkl percussion fuze is removable. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Richmond Petersburg Virginia campaign.
For sale............ $600.

A1853...Rifled artillery projectile, Archer design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, short pattern with long nose and short tapered base, lead band sabot, Confederate rifle, 3 in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following the general designs of Junius Archer. A lead band sabot was cast onto the projectile secured by concentric grooves cast into the base of the shell. This pattern has two deep angled grooves and one narrow groove, sabot extended to bottom groove leaving significant knob on the base.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 78.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.96in., length 6.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 8.3lb. Fired sabot shows 7 lands and grooves, and is intact. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed: solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Chancellorsville, Virginia.
For sale............ $850.

A1856...Rifled artillery projectile, Britten design, English manufacture, bursting shell, pattern with short tapered nose segmented interior, lead cup sabot, threaded for unknown fuze, 10 pounder rifle, 2.9 in. or Ordnance rifle, 3in. Projectile was manufactured by the English and exported to the American conflict, either side could purchase them, but primary use was southern. The design follows Britten's English patent, employing a lead cup sabot with a counter bulge or large concave teat that extends beyond the bottom. There is a ring around the nose which probably was left from it being clamped to the lathe, American producers tended to use knobs. Interior is segmented to provide points of weakness for maximum fragmentation. It appears that the segmented interior, which is hardened steel, may have initially been manufactured as rolled sheet, then bent into a cylinder forming the core, then an iron skin cast onto the cylinder, the casting is very thin on the bottom covered only by the lead cup sabot. Fuze hole is left hand threaded British fuze, however all that have been recovered either were missing the fuze or the fuze was plugged with a wood shipping plug. There is some evidence that these shells were captured by the Federals from the Confederates and were simply fired as bolts due to the problem of them being separated from their fuzes. Projectile measures smaller than 2.9 in. suggesting that it may have originally been intended for the 10 pounder, however, the short length with a soft lead sabot would not have been suited at all for a 3 groove 10 pounder 2.9in. rifle, those missing the sabot may have been fired from this rifle, the torque from firing 3 groove would tend to rip the sabot away. All examples recovered with fired sabot remaining show 7 grooves suggesting most were actually fired from a 3 inch rifle, it would have fit loose in a 3 inch bore and this would account for the weak rifling. It is speculated that this pattern was originally manufactured for the smaller 2.9in. rifle, but most were used in the 3in. rifle as a practical solution.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 110.
G085.jpg (16684 bytes) G085B.jpg (17486 bytes) G085C.jpg (22714 bytes) G085D.jpg (17459 bytes)
Projectile measures: diameter 2.86in., length 5.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 6.2lb. Fired sabot shows 7 lands and grooves, fired from 2.9in. rifle, sabot intact. Threaded fuze was never installed, remnants of wood may be a shipping plug, shell may have been used as a bolt. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Helena, Arkansas.
For sale............ $950.

A1872...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern "common" (standard), narrow ring brass sabot, Schenkl percussion fuze, Parrott 20 pounder rifle, 3.67in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Robert Parrott. The sabot system utilized was a narrow brass ring secured to the base with internal rabbets, referred to as "type III", more flexible than wrought iron and more narrow than the high band, this took the rifling much better than the earlier designs. Some of these shells were configured as case shot, (approx. 17.5lbs to 19lbs. with balls, short, 9.25in.), or as "common" (approx 15lbs. to 17lbs. without balls, long 10.25in.). This shell is a "common" shell, (standard), it does not contain balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Schenkl Army percussion fuze, removable cap had a slider and percussion cap, head is 1.22in.or 1.25in., 10 threads per inch, marked "JP SCHENKL / PAT OCT 16 1861", Jones pg. 98 or 99., top of the fuze hole is milled flat. Bottom of shell usually shows a casting sprue which was rough milled, there will often be casting flaws near the base.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 232.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.6in., length 10.25in. (excluding fuze), weight 15lbs. to 17lbs. Sabot is not fired and is intact. Percussion fuze is fully intact. Metal is solid, minor areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed: drill hole through the side. Recovered: not known.
For sale............ $400.

A1874...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern "common" (standard), narrow ring brass sabot, Parrott "improved one part" percussion fuze, Parrott 20 pounder rifle, 3.67in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Robert Parrott. The sabot system utilized was a narrow brass ring secured to the base with internal rabbets, referred to as "type III", more flexible than wrought iron and more narrow than the high band, this took the rifling much better than the earlier designs. Some of these shells were configured as case shot, (approx. 17.5lbs to 19lbs. with balls, short, 9.25in.), or as "common" (approx 15lbs. to 17lbs. without balls, long 10.25in.). This shell is a "common" shell, (standard), it does not contain balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Parrott zinc "improved" one part design, with a flange, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 81, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat. Bottom of shell usually shows a casting sprue which was rough milled, there will often be casting flaws near the base.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 232.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.62in., length 10.0in. (excluding fuze), weight 17.0lb. Sabot shows 5 lands and grooves and is intact. Percussion fuze may have been cut, exposing the slider with nipple inside. Metal is solid. Projectile is disarmed: drill hole through the side. Recovered: not known.
For sale............ $300.

A2359...Rifled artillery projectile, Read design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, short pattern with pointed nose and single wide bourrelet ring, wrought iron sabot, rifled 32 pounder rifle, 6.4in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following the invention of John Read , the sabot system utilized was a wrought iron ring. This Confederate design, employed a relatively light version of the wrought iron sabot was likely manufactured at Selma. The base is raised and milled to a bevel leaving a depressed ring between the base and the sabot, there is no lathe dimple although this could have been milled out of the flat bottom. This short tapered design, referred to as the "tear drop" design by collectors, was used with other Selma arsenal products and saw limited success, it was intended to be used in the old 32 pounders that had been converted to rifle.
Reference: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 343.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.4in., length 9in., weight 47lbs. This pattern employed a stiff iron sabot which did not take the rifling well, this example could be fired or unfired. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Saint Charles Arkansas, battle in 1862. More information about the battle can be viewed at this link: http://civilwaralbum.com/misc/stcharles.htm.
For sale............ $1,800.

A2444...Rifled artillery projectile, Mullane or Tennessee design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with bourrelet rings, copper disc sabot with 3 studs in the sabot and flush mounted bolt, Archer percussion fuze, Confederate Brooke rifle, 7in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured and is believed to have been developed by Mullane working with Read and others, although Mullane was never granted a patent and period literature often refers to this work as the "Tennessee" design, cup, or sabot. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by studs and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This sabot pattern, referred to as Type II, employed three studs cast into the sabot and fitted into holes cast into the shell body, secured by a bolt in the center. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough, nose is pointed, this pattern is short. Fuze employed was the Archer percussion fuze, Jones pg. 55 or 56.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 428.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.25in. (excluding fuze), weight 56lbs. Sabot is fired showing weak lands and grooves, and is intact. Percussion fuze intact. Metal is stable, projectile recovered from wet ground and has been treated. Projectile is disarmed, sabot bolt is removable and there is drill hole through the bolt hole into the interior. Recovered: Charleston, South Carolina, Long Island, this is the only area of known recovery of this pattern.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 428., this is the example published.
For sale............ $2,500.

A2543...Rifled artillery projectile, Mullane or Tennessee design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, short pattern with blunt nose, bourrelet rings, copper disc cupped sabot with 3 studs in the sabot, rifled 32 pounder or Brooke rifle, 6.4in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured and is believed to have been developed by Mullane working with Read and others, although Mullane was never granted a patent and period literature often refers to this work as the "Tennessee" design, cup, or sabot. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by studs and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This sabot pattern, referred to as Type II, employed three studs cast into the sabot and fitted into holes cast into the shell body, secured by a bolt in the center. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough, the top is only slightly rounded, this flat top was designed to deliver maximum impact against the Federal ironclads. This relatively short bolt was likely intended for the old 32 pounder smoothbores that had been banded and converted to rifled.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 415.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.35in., length 9.25in., weight 65lbs. Sabot is fired showing weak lands and grooves, and is intact. Metal is stable, projectile recovered from wet ground and has been treated. Projectile is disarmed: solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Charleston, South Carolina.
For sale............ $2,500.

A2649...Rifled artillery projectile, Brooke design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, smooth sided pattern with grooves, ratchet ring sabot, Confederate watercap fuze, Brooke rifle or rifled 32 pounder, 6.4in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following John Brooke's design. The sabot system utilized was a copper ring cast onto the shell body, with ratchet notches to hold it in place. The side of the shell was milled, groove at the bottom and starting point at the top gives the appearance of a sleeve, this was done to size the shell as accurately as possible. Fuze employed was a Confederate watercap time fuze, with circular head extending above the flange, flange secured with spanner slots, (Jones Fuzes, pg. 21. Shell is relatively short, this early design was likely originally intended for the rifled 32 pounders, but that system was quickly abandoned for the heavier 7 inch long guns. Performance was unsatisfactory, the sabot would typically be thrown or base would chip, and development efforts moved to the heavy disc sabot.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 175 or 176.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.35in., length 12in., weight 55lbs. Fired sabot is partial, strong example of base chip yet partial sabot remains. Fuze is fully intact. Metal solid, cracks and chips are from firing. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the bottom. Recovered: Charleston, South Carolina.
For sale............ $1,000.

A2676...Rifled artillery projectile, Brooke design, Confederate manufacture, bursting shell, bourreleted ringed long pattern, copper ratchet disc sabot, copper percussion fuze, Confederate Brooke rifle, 6.4in. Projectile was Confederate manufactured following John Brooke's design. The sabot system utilized was a copper disc held in place by ratchet ribs cast into both the heavy sabot and shell body, and secured with a center bolt, a manufacturing innovation allowing the parts made of different metals, copper and iron, to be prepared independent and assembled at the end. This pattern utilized two bourrelet rings, as a labor saving device, only the rings had to be accurately machined, the rest could be left rough. Fuze employed was a copper percussion fuze, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 52 and sequence.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 174.

Projectile measures: diameter 6.35in., length 13.25in. excluding fuze, weight 67lbs. Sabot is fired showing weak lands and grooves. Percussion fuze intact and is removable. Metal is stable, projectile recovered from wet ground and has been treated. Projectile is disarmed: open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Selma, Alabama.
For sale............ $2,000.

A2711...Rifled artillery projectile, James design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, open base with slots, lead and tin sleeve sabot, rifled James 14 pounder rifle, 3.8in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Charles James. The pattern utilized a hollow caged cavity (referred to as a "birdcage", this is not a contemporary term) covered by a thin sleeve of lead, tin, and canvass, the thin sabot would expand into the rifling, and then be discharged after the projectile left the bore. This meant that there would always be flying metal debris from the sabot, which could be a problem for forward troops. Four small holes were drilled into the base, these are thought to have been vent holes, however they are often lead filled. Shell is solid casting, or "bolt" and was designed to be used against opposing cannon by striking the equipment.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 187.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.7in., length 6.75in. weight 12.3lbs, with sabot. Sleeve sabot intact and un-fired. Projectile is disarmed, casting is solid iron never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Jenkins Ferry, Arkansas.
For sale............ $900.

A2876...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot", lead balls packed in sulfur matrix, wrought iron sabot, Parrott time fuze without a flange, Parrott 10 pounder rifle, 2.9in., cut half shell. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the prewar invention of Robert Parrott and John Read working together. The sabot system utilized was a wrought iron ring, referred to as the "Type I" sabot, rifling was precast with three flanges, because it was too stiff to take the rifling otherwise. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 9.5lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. The lead balls are rough cast around .69 cal, packed in sulfur matrix near the top of the shell, powder packed in a long channel which expands near the bottom, on detonation the concentrated powder at the bottom was designed to burn the matrix and propel the balls and fragments forward. Fuze employed was a Parrott zinc time fuze, typically the pattern without a flange, (Jones, Fuzes, pg. 76), edge of the fuze hole is milled thin. Bottom of shell usually shows a casting sprue which was rough milled, there will often be casting flaws near the base.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 216.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.85in., length 8.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 9.8lbs. Cut shell, shows cross section, note fuze hole has no flanges, powder cavity is centered, and there are significant casting flaws in the base. Sabot shows 3 lands and grooves and is intact. Time fuze is partial. Metal is solid. Projectile is disarmed: cut shell, everything is exposed. Recovered: not known.
For sale............ Cut shell shows cross section., either half $225., both $375.

A2890...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot" balls packed in sulfur matrix, rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze, nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead balls are packed in yellow or sulfur matrix. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, left.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight not meaningful. Cut shell shows cross section. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Metal solid, sabot is partial, time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell exposes everything. Recovered: Virginia campaign.
For sale............ Cut shell, mounted on wood display, half on right available $200.

A2964.2...Navy watercap time fuze, 1862.
Navy watercap fuze, markings, "ORD. D (anchor) / (date)", Jones pg. 10.


Watercap fuze with clean threads.
For sale.............$75.

A2973...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, thin walled mortar with lifting ears, wood fuze with 1.25in. opening, smoothbore mortar, 8in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals for the heavy mortars. Designed for siege operations, these guns were designed to send a projectile on a high trajectory into the enemy trench. Depth of the fuze hole is approximately 1.5in., this is much lighter than the Columbiad seige gun. Many were cast with tong or lifting ears for lifting into a mortar. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, larger opening, 1.25in. for a mortar.
Reference: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 55.

Projectile measures: diameter 7.9in., weight 43lbs. Wood fuze is missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: not known.
For sale............ $225.

A2993. Rifled artillery projectile, Hotchkiss design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pattern with flame grooves, rounded nose, "case shot" lead balls packed loose without matrix or with asphalt matrix, iron separator bolt, lead band sabot, Hotchkiss brass time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in. Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Andrew Hotchkiss. The pattern consisted of three parts, a nose section containing the explosive charge, a cast iron cup fitted on the bottom, and lead band sabot cast around the middle, on firing the cup would compress the lead band sabot expanding it into the rifling. Some of these shells were "common" or standard rounds, explosive charge only, or "case shot", filled with balls. This is "case shot", with a time fuze it was designed to be used against troops by spreading large volume of fragments and balls over the open field of fighting. Lead balls were packed in sawdust only, early production, or black asphalt matrix, later production. The nose is rounded to accomodate the extra load of balls and the casting in the nose is thin to encourage breakage forward in the nose. There are two chambers in the nose, all of the powder is in the lower chamber, all of the balls are in the upper chamber, there is an iron seperator bolt in the middle, with a hole and a narrow metal channel to allow the flame to pass from the fuze to detonate the powder in the lower chamber. On detonation, the exploding powder in the base was expected to push the seperator bolt and the balls forward and out the weak top section of the nose. The nose was cast as one part, the bottom is solid, the separator bolt apparently was precast and imbedded in the core, then positioned after casting once the core was removed, it is larger than the fuze opening. Three flame grooves added so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze. Fuze employed was a Hotchkiss brass time fuze, with slots and a flange, Jones pg. 87. Hotchkiss patent date was cast, not stamped, into the base, "HOTCHKISS PATENT OCTOBER 9, 1855", and is typically very weak and may have been omitted entirely as the molds wore down or were replaced.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 167.

Projectile measures: diameter 2.9in., length 7.0in unfired, 6.75in. sabot compressed from firing, excluding fuze, weight 9.1lbs. Lead band sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Hotchkiss brass time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: 1864 Shenandoah Valley Virginia campaign, Fishers Hill, Virginia.
For sale............ $275.

A3033...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern "case shot", with lead balls packed in asphalt matrix, narrow ring brass sabot, Parrott time fuze with a flange, Parrott 20 pounder rifle, 3.67in.  Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Robert Parrott. The sabot system utilized was a narrow brass ring secured to the base with internal rabbets, referred to as "type III", more flexible than wrought iron and more narrow than the high band, this took the rifling much better than the earlier designs. Some of these shells were configured as case shot, (approx. 17.5lbs to 19lbs. with balls, short, 9.25in.), or as "common" (approx 15lbs. to 17lbs. without balls, long 10.25in.). This shell is "case shot.", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. The lead balls are rough cast around .69 cal, packed in black asphalt matrix near the top of the shell, powder packed in a long channel which expands near the bottom, on detonation the concentrated powder at the bottom was designed to burn the matrix and propel the balls and fragments forward. Fuze employed was a Parrott zinc time fuze, typically the pattern with a long stem and flat top with a flange, an innovation to prevent gas leaks around the fuze causing premature detonations, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 77 upper right, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat. Bottom of shell usually shows a casting sprue which was rough milled, there will often be casting flaws near the base.
Reference: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 231.

Projectile measures: diameter 3.6in., length 9.25in. (excluding fuze), weight 18.5lbs to 19lbs. Projectile is fired, low band sabot seperated on firing. Shell is cut shows case shot balls packed in black asphalt. Note that the balls melted during firing and became pressed flat against the bottom, this left a void in the top under the fuze which is why it failed to detonate. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell exposes interior. Recovered: not determined.
For sale............ Projectile is cut showing cross section, half available, right side in picture $200.

This is the end of the artillery sales listings, go back to the beginning.

Artillery sales listings, page 1, item numbers up to A1499.
Artillery sales listings, page 2, item numbers A1500 to end.

Ridgeway Civil War Research Center,
A virtual examination of artifacts of the American Civil War
Artillery
A0050.jpg (18149 bytes)
click here for more information about artillery, research and comparison to other examples.

Shipping of artillery shells and my show schedule:
Shipping shells almost anywhere is not a problem. UPS accepts packages up to 150 pounds, this will take care of most shells below 8 inch Parrotts and 13 inch round balls. Heavier than that requires common carrier. I charge shipping at estimated commercial cost. I attend some shows and I can deliver any shell to a show to be picked up at no charge. However, please understand that I only bring a small sampling of shells to sit on my table at a show, these things are heavy to haul in and out of a show, and so most shells I bring to a show are making a one way trip. So while I may have many shells on my webpage, I typically bring only a limited sampling to the shows. So if you see a shell you want, please tell me you want it before I leave for a show, and I can bring it for you or work a layaway with final payment to be made at the show.

Back to relicman.com main page.

Place an Order
.