Ridgeway Civil War Research Center,
A virtual examination of artifacts of the American Civil War


Civil War Artillery
by Harry Ridgeway

Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, Confederate copper time fuze, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Artillery 1260 Ball Confederate copper fuzed 12pdr. 4.62in.

This is the "Ridgeway Civil War Research Center...", a research tool for educational purposes only, and is provided at no cost to the reader. Some of the relics listed are retained in the author's collection, most reside in other collections and are not owned by the author. None of the items listed in this section are for sale, please refer to relicman.com sales listings for items offered for sale. This is a work in progress, I list items as I get to them, there are many patterns that are not listed yet, this list will be regularly updated as I get pictures and descriptions for more items. I will also correct mistakes, so if you see any please tell me. All items listed are believed to be authentic to the Civil War or as otherwise described. Any excavated relics have been recovered from private property with owners permission. This information is available for research purposes, pictures may be used by permission only.
All projectiles listed have been disarmed.

Most information on this page is from:
Field Artillery Projectiles of the American Civil War, 1993 Edition. by Thomas S. Dickey and Peter C. George.
Civil War Heavy Explosive Ordnance, A Guide to Large Artillery Prjectiles, Torpedoes, and Mines, by Jack Bell.
Artillery Fuses of the Civil War, by Charles H. Jones.
Pictures are by the author, unless otherwise indicated.

Weapons used:
Smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in. Caliber of the gun is 4.62in., round projectile diameter should measure 4.52 in. approximately, variations will be noted.
Coehorn mortar 12 pounder, 4.62in. Caliber of the gun is 4.62in., round projectile diameter should measure 4.52 in. approximately, variations will be noted.


Artillery 1261 Ball Confederate copper fuzed 12pdr. 4.62in.
Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), Confederate copper time fuze, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile was intended for the smoothbore 12 pounder "Napoleon". This pattern is Confederate wartime manufactured using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is a "common" shell, or standard, and does not contain balls, however the relatively heavy weight suggests that its interior is polygonal. By segmenting the interior into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 9lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2102...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), Confederate copper time fuze, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile was intended for the smoothbore 12 pounder "Napoleon". This pattern is Confederate wartime manufactured using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is a "common" shell, or standard, and does not contain balls, however the relatively heavy weight suggests that its interior is polygonal. By segmenting the interior into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 9lbs. Copper time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2246...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), Confederate copper time fuze, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile was intended for the smoothbore 12 pounder "Napoleon". This pattern is Confederate wartime manufactured using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is a "common" shell, or standard, and does not contain balls, however the relatively heavy weight suggests that its interior is polygonal. By segmenting the interior into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 9lbs. Copper time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2475...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), Confederate copper time fuze, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile was intended for the smoothbore 12 pounder "Napoleon". This pattern is Confederate wartime manufactured using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is a "common" shell, or standard, and does not contain balls, however the relatively heavy weight suggests that its interior is polygonal. By segmenting the interior into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 9lbs. Copper time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2621...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), Confederate copper time fuze, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile was intended for the smoothbore 12 pounder "Napoleon". This pattern is Confederate wartime manufactured using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is a "common" shell, or standard, and does not contain balls, however the relatively heavy weight suggests that its interior is polygonal. By segmenting the interior into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 7.6lbs., empty, without fuze. Cut shell showing cross section with polygonal cavity and threaded fuze. Copper time fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell everything is open. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2693...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), Confederate copper time fuze, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile was intended for the smoothbore 12 pounder "Napoleon". This pattern is Confederate wartime manufactured using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is a "common" shell, or standard, and does not contain balls, however the relatively heavy weight suggests that its interior is polygonal. By segmenting the interior into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 7.6lbs., empty, without fuze. Cut shell showing cross section with polygonal cavity and threaded fuze. Copper time fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell everything is open. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.


Artillery 1262 Ball Confederate copper fuzed 12pdr. 4.62in.
Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A1676...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A1788...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2212...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 9.3lbs. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Third Battle of Winchester by Dainey Wiley.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.
Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia

A2243...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2474...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2491...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2592...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2694...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2695...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2796...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2859...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2867...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2900...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Projectile is cut exposing case shot balls in sulfur matrix, time fuze and the lead side plug. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A2932...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.

Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., Projectile is cut exposing case shot balls in sulfur matrix, time fuze and the lead side plug. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

A3015...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, lead sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a lead sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in. Projectile is cut exposing case shot balls in sulfur matrix, time fuze and the lead side plug. Copper time fuze and lead plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Third Battle of Winchester, Virginia by John Scully.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.

Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia


Artillery 1263 Ball Confederate copper fuzed 12pdr. 4.62in.
Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, uiron sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with an iron sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 42.

A0664...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, uiron sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with an iron sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 9.4lbs. Copper time fuze and iron plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 42.

A1787...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, uiron sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with an iron sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Copper time fuze and iron plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 42.

A2433...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, uiron sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.

Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with an iron sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Projectile is cut exposing case shot balls in sulfur matrix, time fuze and the iron side plug. Copper fuze and lead sideplug intact, Projectile is disarmed by drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 42.

A2490...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, uiron sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with an iron sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Metal solid with light pitting, copper time fuze and iron plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 42.


Artillery 1264 Ball Confederate copper fuzed 12pdr. 4.62in.
Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, copper sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a copper sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 42.

A0015...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, copper sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a copper sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 9.9lbs. This one used a copper sideplug, which is a recycled Bormann fuze under-plug. Copper time fuze, brass plug are intact, metal quality is strong. Ball disarmed, drill hole though paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Third Battle Winchester, Virginia by Harry Ridgeway, 1960's. Shell was found initially in the dead of winter at the site now occupied by Dowell J Howard school. At the time the ground was too frozen to dig so the location was carefully cross referenced and dug with the first thaw!
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 32.
Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia

A1786...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, copper sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
A1786.jpg (38024 bytes) A1786C.jpg (34401 bytes) Projectile is Confederate wartime manufacture for the light smoothbore "Napoleon" cannon using the copper time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Those with side plugs were generally configured as case shot (approx 10lbs. with iron balls), those without side plugs are usually "common" (approx 9lbs.) and without balls. This shell is "case shot" and employed a side plug as a way to load iron balls into the shell. Conventional case shot shells were usually filled with soft matrix and lead balls, an auger would be used to drill through the lead balls and the matrix to create a void for the powder train. Because of a shortage of lead, the Confederates substituted iron balls. To drill through a mixture of matrix and iron balls would be difficult, so a sizing rod would be inserted through the fuze hole to reserve a void for the powder, the iron balls and matrix would be loaded through a side hole, once loaded the side hole would be plugged, the sizing rod would be removed, and the powder train would be filled. This one was sealed with a copper sideplug. Fuze employed was a Confederate copper time fuze, short pattern for spherical projectiles, with flange and spanner holes, the fuze hole is recessed to seat the flange flush with the curvature of the ball, (Jones pg. 38). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 10lbs. Metal solid with light pitting, copper time fuze and copper plug intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 42.


Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, iron sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in., fragments

A0200.03...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, iron sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in., fragments
Thse 12 pounder fragments are all Confederate fuzed. The Confederate fuze has a single threat of threads, fuze is flanged and seated in a recessed area that is not threaded. This fuzing system was used for both "common" shell and "case shot" sideloaders. Recovered: Shenandoah Valley, Virginia 1864 campaign, Third Battle of Winchester and Battle of Cedar Creek, by Harry Ridgeway.
Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia

A0200.04...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, iron sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in., fragments
These 12 pounder fragments are from "case shot " side loaders. Each fragment shows the threads for a side loader, the diameter is approximately the same as a Bormann underplug. Most plugs were lead, threads will be seen in the side of the lead plugs, once expelled from the shell. Recovered: Shenandoah Valley, Virginia 1864 campaign, Third Battle of Winchester and Battle of Cedar Creek, by Harry Ridgeway.
Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia

A0200.08...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, iron sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in., fragments
This12 pounder fragment appears to be fuze hole for a Confederate fuze, this based on diameter. However there is not a recess for the flanged fuze to seat. Apparently the fuze was meant to simply sit on top of the ball. This would mean the ball would not be round once the fuze is installed, This might work in a mortor, but would not work in the Naploeon. Recovered: Shenandoah Valley, Virginia campaign, by Harry Ridgeway.
Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia

A0007...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, iron sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in., fragments
This ground burst fragmented into a small number of large pieces. The considerable variation of thickness caused this. This CSA side loader is typical of poor quality castings by the struggling Confederate foundries. Note that about half of the hole for the side loader remains along with the fragments and balls that exploded downward into the ground and thus were Recovered: partially intact. Recovered: Battle of Cedar Creek (Garrett farm), by Harry Ridgeway.
Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia

A0014...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "case shot", Confederate copper time fuze, iron sideplug, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in., fragments
This fragment has an iron side plug remaining intact. The federals used lead balls for grape shot. They would simply fill the shell with the ball and powder mixture, then use an auger to drill a hole in the mixture, screw in the fuze, and it is ready for battle. The Confederates typically used iron in order to conserve crucial supplies of scarce lead. To drill around mixtures of iron and powder is an invitation for disaster due to the tendency of iron to spark. So the Confederates came up with a very practical solution. They put two holes in the shell, first inserting the fuze, then the mixture of balls and powder then this simple side plug requiring no drilling. Hence any shells with side plugs are Confederate manufacture. Recovered: Third Battle Winchester, Virginia, by Harry Ridgeway.
Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia


Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, Confederate copper time fuze substitute for Bormann fuze, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.

Do not publish until I get a more conclusive example.
A0672...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, Confederate copper time fuze substitute for Bormann fuze, smoothbore 12 pounder, 4.62in.
Projectile was intended for the smoothbore 12 pounder "Napoleon" using the Bormann time fuze designed to detonate in the air above the target, spreading fragments against troops in the open field. Shell was cast to take a Bormann time fuze, however, due to repeated failures, this Confederate copper fuze with a wide head was designed as a substitute. Using the conventional Confederate design of a copper time fuze with spanner holes, this fuze was designed with a larger diameter head so that it would neatly fit into the larger Bormann fuze hole, (Jones pg. 44). Projectile measures: diameter 4.52in., weight 8.4lbs. Bormann substitute time fuze intact. Metal is uncleaned . Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through paper section of time fuze. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), not listed.


Ball, "case shot" shell, Confederate Bormann replacement fuze, smoothbore 12 pounder 4.62 in.
Do not publish until I get a more conclusive example.

A1776...Ball, "case shot" shell, Confederate Bormann replacement fuze, smoothbore 12 pounder 4.62 in.
The Confederates were unable to successfully replicate the Bormann fuze, this oversized time fuze was made as a reasonable substitute.
Confederate Bormann replacement fuze, with slots, (Jones pg. 43)
Fuze intact and is removable, I believe fuze is a reproduction, but is good illustration, ball is filled with iron slugs.
Diameter 4.52 in.
Ref: D & G not listed. (Case shot shell, fuze with slots).

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