Ridgeway Civil War Research Center,
A virtual examination of artifacts of the American Civil War


Civil War Artillery
by Harry Ridgeway

Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, wood time fuze, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Artillery 1430 Ball wood fuze 24pdr. 5.82in.

This is the "Ridgeway Civil War Research Center...", a research tool for educational purposes only, and is provided at no cost to the reader. Some of the relics listed are retained in the author's collection, most reside in other collections and are not owned by the author. None of the items listed in this section are for sale, please refer to relicman.com sales listings for items offered for sale. This is a work in progress, I list items as I get to them, there are many patterns that are not listed yet, this list will be regularly updated as I get pictures and descriptions for more items. I will also correct mistakes, so if you see any please tell me. All items listed are believed to be authentic to the Civil War or as otherwise described. Any excavated relics have been recovered from private property with owners permission. This information is available for research purposes, pictures may be used by permission only.
All projectiles listed have been disarmed.

Most information on this page is from:
Field Artillery Projectiles of the American Civil War, 1993 Edition. by Thomas S. Dickey and Peter C. George.
Civil War Heavy Explosive Ordnance, A Guide to Large Artillery Prjectiles, Torpedoes, and Mines, by Jack Bell.
Artillery Fuses of the Civil War, by Charles H. Jones.
Pictures are by the author, unless otherwise indicated.

Weapons used:
Coehorn mortar 24 pounder, 5.82in. Caliber of the gun is 5.82in., round projectile diameter should measure 5.68 in. approximately, variations will be noted.
Smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82in. Caliber of the gun is 5.82in., round projectile diameter should measure 5.68 in. approximately, variations will be noted.


Artillery 1431 Ball wood fuze 24pdr. 5.82in.
Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16lbs. (empty).
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A0019...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16lbs. (empty). Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Savannah Georgia.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A1699. Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 17.0lb. Wood fuze intact, straps intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: City Point, Virginia ammunition explosion.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2177. Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 17lbs. (empty). Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes interior. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2322...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 15.6lbs. (empty). Wood fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2323...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16lbs. (empty). Projectile is cut showing rounded interior. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2683...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16lbs. (empty). Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Petersburg, Virginia.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2691...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16lbs. (empty). Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2724...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 15lbs. Metal solid, some pitting, wood fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2725...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16.4lbs. (empty). Metal solid, wood fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2944...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16.3lb. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Virginia campaign, not confirmed.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2946...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16.6lb. Metal solid wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Virginia campaign, not confirmed.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2947...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16.5lb. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Virginia campaign, not confirmed.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51

A2949...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16.0lb. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Virginia campaign, not confirmed.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2955...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16.4lb. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Virginia campaign, not confirmed.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2956...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16.4lb. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Virginia campaign, not confirmed.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.


Artillery 1432 Ball wood fuze 24pdr. 5.82in.
Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with . 875in. opening, Coehorn mortar with lifting ears, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. This ball was cast with lifting ears, this to facilitate positioning the ball in the barrel with the fuze facing opposite the powder charge. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.). Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16lbs. (empty).
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 44.

A2616...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with . 875in. opening, Coehorn mortar with lifting ears, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. This ball was cast with lifting ears, this to facilitate positioning the ball in the barrel with the fuze facing opposite the powder charge. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.). Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16lbs. (empty). Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes interior. Recovered: Petersburg, Virginia.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 44.


Artillery 1433 Ball wood fuze 24pdr. 5.82in.
Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with 1.125in. opening, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the larger fuze hole, was intended for the longer range cannons, however it could alternately be used for the Coehorn mortar . Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16lbs. (empty).
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.

A2726...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, "common" (standard), wood time fuze with 1.125in. opening, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82 in.
Projectile with the larger fuze hole, was intended for the longer range cannons, however it could alternately be used for the Coehorn mortar . Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. Those with rounded cavity and thick walls likely did not carry balls and are "common" rounds (standard). Relatively thick casting, shell is apparently a "common" shot. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 16.4lbs. (empty). Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes interior. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 51.


Artillery 1434 Ball wood fuze 24pdr. 5.82in.
Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, polygonal cavity diamond pattern, wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. This pattern is Confederate manufacture during the war. Instead of the usual round bursting chamber the interior was segmented into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. This pattern was cast using the four sided diamond shape, (Dickey & George Fig C-4 pg. 527), wall is very thick. Often the core would drift off center during casting, the resultant off center cavity would tend to negate the benefits of the segmented interior. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 18lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 48.

A1697...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, polygonal cavity diamond pattern, wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. This pattern is Confederate manufacture during the war. Instead of the usual round bursting chamber the interior was segmented into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. This pattern was cast using the four sided diamond shape, (Dickey & George Fig C-4 pg. 527), wall is very thick. Often the core would drift off center during casting, the resultant off center cavity would tend to negate the benefits of the segmented interior. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 18.5lbs., empty. Cut shell shows diagonal polygonal interior. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell exposes interior. Recovered: La Fourche Rail Crossing outside Tipado, Louisiana, found Nov 1974.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 48.

A1698...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, polygonal cavity diamond pattern, wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. This pattern is Confederate manufacture during the war. Instead of the usual round bursting chamber the interior was segmented into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. This pattern was cast using the four sided diamond shape, (Dickey & George Fig C-4 pg. 527), wall is very thick. Often the core would drift off center during casting, the resultant off center cavity would tend to negate the benefits of the segmented interior. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 18lbs. Cut shell shows diagonal polygonal interior. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell exposes interior. Recovered: Spanish Fort, Blakeley, Alabama.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 48.

A2329...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, polygonal cavity diamond pattern, wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. This pattern is Confederate manufacture during the war. Instead of the usual round bursting chamber the interior was segmented into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. This pattern was cast using the four sided diamond shape, (Dickey & George Fig C-4 pg. 527), wall is very thick. Often the core would drift off center during casting, the resultant off center cavity would tend to negate the benefits of the segmented interior. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 18.5lbs. Cut shell shows diagonal polygonal interior. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell exposes interior. Recovered: Spanish Fort, Blakeley, Alabama.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 48.

A2827...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, polygonal cavity diamond pattern, wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. This pattern is Confederate manufacture during the war. Instead of the usual round bursting chamber the interior was segmented into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. This pattern was cast using the four sided diamond shape, (Dickey & George Fig C-4 pg. 527), wall is very thick. Often the core would drift off center during casting, the resultant off center cavity would tend to negate the benefits of the segmented interior. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 18lbs. Cut shell shows diagonal polygonal interior. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell exposes interior. Recovered: Spanish Fort, Blakeley, Alabama.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 48.

A2828...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, polygonal cavity diamond pattern, wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. This pattern is Confederate manufacture during the war. Instead of the usual round bursting chamber the interior was segmented into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. This pattern was cast using the four sided diamond shape, (Dickey & George Fig C-4 pg. 527), wall is very thick. Often the core would drift off center during casting, the resultant off center cavity would tend to negate the benefits of the segmented interior. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 18lbs. Cut shell shows diagonal polygonal interior. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell exposes interior. Recovered: Spanish Fort, Blakeley, Alabama.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 48.

A2945...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, polygonal cavity diamond pattern, wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82in.
Projectile with the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. However it could alternately be used for the longer range cannons Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. This pattern is Confederate manufacture during the war. Instead of the usual round bursting chamber the interior was segmented into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. This pattern was cast using the four sided diamond shape, (Dickey & George Fig C-4 pg. 527), wall is very thick. Often the core would drift off center during casting, the resultant off center cavity would tend to negate the benefits of the segmented interior. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 18lbs. Cut shell shows diagonal polygonal interior. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell exposes interior. Recovered: Spanish Fort, Blakeley, Alabama.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 48.

A2948...Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, bursting shell, polygonal cavity diamond pattern, wood time fuze with .875in. opening, Coehorn mortar, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82in.
Ball with polygonal cavity and the small wood fuze hole was intended for the Coehorn mortar, a relatively light cannon that could be lifted and placed into position by a couple of strong men behind a trench line, it was effective against troops in the opposing trench line. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, fuze hole is smooth and tapered, the simple to make fuze could easily be hammered into place, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Shell was cast for a smaller opening, (.875in. versus 1.125in.) may have originally distinguished the mortar from the howitzer cannon, but the difference is slight and apparently either would do if needed. By segmenting the interior into polygonal forms, points of weakness would be created to facilitate more uniform fragmentation. This pattern was cast using the four sided diamond shape, (Dickey & George Fig C-4 pg. 527), wall is very thick. Often the core would drift off center during casting, the resultant off-center cavity would tend to negate the benefits of the segmented interior. Projectile measures: diameter 5.7in., weight 18lbs. Cut shell shows diagonal polygonal interior. Wood fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell exposes interior. Recovered: Spanish Fort, Blakeley, Alabama.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 48. Cut shell


Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82in., fragments

A0200.09. Smoothbore artillery projectile, spherical ball, smoothbore 24 pounder, 5.82in., fragments
Fragments of 24 pounder ball were all found at "west fort", Second Battle of Winchester. Both case shot and common shot fragments were found. This was a Federal battery, captured by the Confederates. The shells were fired on this fort by the Federal artillery from Milroy's main battery. It is interesting to note that the batteries are nearly a mile apart, which means these shells were fired from a flanking 24 pounder, not a mortar. Milroy's defenses of Winchester in 1863 was a system of three hill top batteries in triangle fashion, this was an elevated inland fort and not a river or harbor fort. Flanking 24 pounder guns had only typically been used in coastal forts, Milroy's hilltop fort was equipped with both 32 pounder heavy guns and these 24 pounder flanking guns, this was unconventional for the period. All of these fragments were recovered from "west fort", Second Battle of Winchester, by Harry Ridgeway and Margaurite Smith.
Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia


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