Ridgeway Civil War Research Center,
A virtual examination of artifacts of the American Civil War


Civil War Artillery

by Harry Ridgeway


Artillery projectile, stand of grape, 6.4in.
Artillery 2650 grape stand 6.4in.

This is the "Ridgeway Civil War Research Center...", a research tool for educational purposes only, and is provided at no cost to the reader. Some of the relics listed are retained in the author's collection, most reside in other collections and are not owned by the author. None of the items listed in this section are for sale, please refer to relicman.com sales listings for items offered for sale. This is a work in progress, I list items as I get to them, there are many patterns that are not listed yet, this list will be regularly updated as I get pictures and descriptions for more items. I will also correct mistakes, so if you see any please tell me. All items listed are believed to be authentic to the Civil War or as otherwise described. Any excavated relics have been recovered from private property with owners permission. This information is available for research purposes, pictures may be used by permission only.
All projectiles listed have been disarmed.

Most information on this page is from:
Field Artillery Projectiles of the American Civil War, 1993 Edition. by Thomas S. Dickey and Peter C. George.
Civil War Heavy Explosive Ordnance, A Guide to Large Artillery Prjectiles, Torpedoes, and Mines, by Jack Bell.
Artillery Fuses of the Civil War, by Charles H. Jones.
Pictures are by the author, unless otherwise indicated.


Artillery 2651 grape stand 6.4in.
Artillery projectile, stand of grape, canvass or "quilt" covered, iron balls, 32 pounder, 6.4in.
The stand of grape was the artillerist's weapon of last resort. Once the enemy got close to the battery, the gunners would load these rounds, and the flimsy stand would burst on firing sending the contents in scatter fashion against the troops charging the cannon. The fire was devastating against the troops but the enemy would be so close that options to reload and shoot would have been limited. The quilted stand was an early design, the base and post were cast as a unit, three rows of four balls (12 total) were stacked around the post, then covered with canvass and twine, this early design did not have rings or a top. Based on the diameter of this projectile, it is believed that this could be used with any 6.4in. cannon, either 32 pounder smoothbore, or rifled 32 pounder. This pattern was developed well before the Civil War and it is documented that a supply of them was available in the southern arsenals. However close fighting with these large guns seldom occurred, so most of these projectiles were simply discarded. Projectile measures: diameter 6.1in., length 9in. (excluding fuze), weight 30lbs. Individual balls will measure 2.875in. approximately, the balls are often irregular.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 99.

A0138...Artillery projectile, stand of grape, canvass or "quilt" covered, iron balls, 32 pounder, 6.4in.
The stand of grape was the artillerist's weapon of last resort. Once the enemy got close to the battery, the gunners would load these rounds, and the flimsy stand would burst on firing sending the contents in scatter fashion against the troops charging the cannon. The fire was devastating against the troops but the enemy would be so close that options to reload and shoot would have been limited. The quilted stand was an early design, the base and post were cast as a unit, three rows of four balls (12 total) were stacked around the post, then covered with canvass and twine, this early design did not have rings or a top. Based on the diameter of this projectile, it is believed that this could be used with any 6.4in. cannon, either 32 pounder smoothbore, or rifled 32 pounder. This pattern was developed well before the Civil War and it is documented that a supply of them was available in the southern arsenals. However close fighting with these large guns seldom occurred, so most of these projectiles were simply discarded. Projectile measures: diameter 6.1in., length 9in. (excluding fuze), weight 30lbs. Individual balls will measure 2.875in. approximately, the balls are often irregular. Stand and 12 balls are all original, a reproduction canvass covering and twine has been added for illustration. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting, never had a bursting charge. Recovered: James River area around Richmond, Virginia.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 99.

A0534...Artillery projectile, stand of grape, canvass or "quilt" covered, iron balls, 32 pounder, 6.4in.
The stand of grape was the artillerist's weapon of last resort. Once the enemy got close to the battery, the gunners would load these rounds, and the flimsy stand would burst on firing sending the contents in scatter fashion against the troops charging the cannon. The fire was devastating against the troops but the enemy would be so close that options to reload and shoot would have been limited. The quilted stand was an early design, the base and post were cast as a unit, three rows of four balls (12 total) were stacked around the post, then covered with canvass and twine, this early design did not have rings or a top. Based on the diameter of this projectile, it is believed that this could be used with any 6.4in. cannon, either 32 pounder smoothbore, or rifled 32 pounder. This pattern was developed well before the Civil War and it is documented that a supply of them was available in the southern arsenals. However close fighting with these large guns seldom occurred, so most of these projectiles were simply discarded. Projectile measures: diameter 6.1in., length 9in. (excluding fuze), weight 30lbs. Individual balls will measure 2.875in. approximately, the balls are often irregular. This stand and balls were all found together. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting, never had a bursting charge. Recovered: Kinston, North Carolina by Willie Lewis.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 99.

A2362...Artillery projectile, stand of grape, canvass or "quilt" covered, iron balls, 32 pounder, 6.4in.
The stand of grape was the artillerist's weapon of last resort. Once the enemy got close to the battery, the gunners would load these rounds, and the flimsy stand would burst on firing sending the contents in scatter fashion against the troops charging the cannon. The fire was devastating against the troops but the enemy would be so close that options to reload and shoot would have been limited. The quilted stand was an early design, the base and post were cast as a unit, three rows of four balls (12 total) were stacked around the post, then covered with canvass and twine, this early design did not have rings or a top. Based on the diameter of this projectile, it is believed that this could be used with any 6.4in. cannon, either 32 pounder smoothbore, or rifled 32 pounder. This pattern was developed well before the Civil War and it is documented that a supply of them was available in the southern arsenals. However close fighting with these large guns seldom occurred, so most of these projectiles were simply discarded. Projectile measures: diameter 6.1in., length 9in. (excluding fuze), weight 30lbs. Individual balls will measure 2.875in. approximately, the balls are often irregular. Stand and 12 balls are all original, each row of four balls have been pinned together and will lift on or off the stand as a unit, a nice way to restore and display this stand, the balls were originally held together with canvass covering. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting, never had a bursting charge. Recovered: James River area around Richmond, Virginia.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 99.

A2437...Artillery projectile, stand of grape, canvass or "quilt" covered, iron balls, 32 pounder, 6.4in.
The stand of grape was the artillerist's weapon of last resort. Once the enemy got close to the battery, the gunners would load these rounds, and the flimsy stand would burst on firing sending the contents in scatter fashion against the troops charging the cannon. The fire was devastating against the troops but the enemy would be so close that options to reload and shoot would have been limited. The quilted stand was an early design, the base and post were cast as a unit, three rows of four balls (12 total) were stacked around the post, then covered with canvass and twine, this early design did not have rings or a top. Based on the diameter of this projectile, it is believed that this could be used with any 6.4in. cannon, either 32 pounder smoothbore, or rifled 32 pounder. This pattern was developed well before the Civil War and it is documented that a supply of them was available in the southern arsenals. However close fighting with these large guns seldom occurred, so most of these projectiles were simply discarded. Projectile measures: diameter 6.1in., length 9in. (excluding fuze), weight 30lbs. Individual balls will measure 2.875in. approximately, the balls are often irregular. Stand and 12 balls are all original, balls have been mounted and glued for display. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting, never had a bursting charge. Recovered: James River area around Richmond, Virginia.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 99.

A2809...Artillery projectile, stand of grape, canvass or "quilt" covered, iron balls, 32 pounder, 6.4in.
The stand of grape was the artillerist's weapon of last resort. Once the enemy got close to the battery, the gunners would load these rounds, and the flimsy stand would burst on firing sending the contents in scatter fashion against the troops charging the cannon. The fire was devastating against the troops but the enemy would be so close that options to reload and shoot would have been limited. The quilted stand was an early design, the base and post were cast as a unit, three rows of four balls (12 total) were stacked around the post, then covered with canvass and twine, this early design did not have rings or a top. Based on the diameter of this projectile, it is believed that this could be used with any 6.4in. cannon, either 32 pounder smoothbore, or rifled 32 pounder. This pattern was developed well before the Civil War and it is documented that a supply of them was available in the southern arsenals. However close fighting with these large guns seldom occurred, so most of these projectiles were simply discarded. Projectile measures: diameter 6.1in., length 9in. (excluding fuze), weight 30lbs. Individual balls will measure 2.875in. approximately, the balls are often irregular. Stand and 12 balls are all original, each row of four balls have been pinned together and will lift on or off the stand as a unit, a nice way to restore and display this stand, the balls were originally held together with canvass covering. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting, never had a bursting charge. Recovered: James River area around Richmond, Virginia.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 99.


Artillery 2652 grape stand 6.4in.
Artillery projectile, stand of grape, contained by rings and plates, iron balls, no sabot, 32 pounder, or rifle 6.4in.
The stand of grape was the artillerist's weapon of last resort. Once the enemy got close to the battery, the gunners would load these rounds, and the flimsy stand would burst on firing sending the contents in scatter fashion against the troops charging the cannon. The fire was devastating against the troops but the enemy would be so close that options to reload and shoot would have been limited. The stand of grape consisted of top and bottom plates, held together with a bolt and nut, three rows of three balls (9 total) were stacked around the post, and held in place with two rings and the bolt. The bolt is held in place by a threaded nut on the top, bottom is loosely fitted into a slightly irregular hole on the bottom plate. Based on the diameter of this projectile, it is believed that this could be used with any 6.4in. cannon, smoothbore 32 pounder, rifled 32 pounder or the Confederate Brook rifle. Projectile measures: diameter 6.2 in., length 8 in., weight 40 lbs. Individual balls will measure 2.875in. approximately, the balls are often irregular.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 105.

A0135...Artillery projectile, stand of grape, contained by rings and plates, iron balls, no sabot, 32 pounder, or rifle 6.4in.
The stand of grape was the artillerist's weapon of last resort. Once the enemy got close to the battery, the gunners would load these rounds, and the flimsy stand would burst on firing sending the contents in scatter fashion against the troops charging the cannon. The fire was devastating against the troops but the enemy would be so close that options to reload and shoot would have been limited. The stand of grape consisted of top and bottom plates, held together with a bolt and nut, three rows of three balls (9 total) were stacked around the post, and held in place with two rings and the bolt. The bolt is held in place by a threaded nut on the top, bottom is loosely fitted into a slightly irregular hole on the bottom plate. Based on the diameter of this projectile, it is believed that this could be used with any 6.4in. cannon, smoothbore 32 pounder, rifled 32 pounder or the Confederate Brook rifle. Projectile measures: diameter 6.2 in., length 8 in., weight 39lbs. Individual balls will measure 2.875in. approximately, the balls are often irregular. Dug projectile, all parts original this has never been taken apart. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting, never had a bursting charge. This was one of the stands found in an abandoned battery by Jim Nall, as published in the NSTVol VI No 3 March April 1979, pg. 26.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 105.

A2377...Artillery projectile, stand of grape, contained by rings and plates, iron balls, no sabot, 32 pounder, or rifle 6.4in.
The stand of grape was the artillerist's weapon of last resort. Once the enemy got close to the battery, the gunners would load these rounds, and the flimsy stand would burst on firing sending the contents in scatter fashion against the troops charging the cannon. The fire was devastating against the troops but the enemy would be so close that options to reload and shoot would have been limited. The stand of grape consisted of top and bottom plates, held together with a bolt and nut, three rows of three balls (9 total) were stacked around the post, and held in place with two rings and the bolt. The bolt is held in place by a threaded nut on the top, bottom is loosely fitted into a slightly irregular hole on the bottom plate. Based on the diameter of this projectile, it is believed that this could be used with any 6.4in. cannon, smoothbore 32 pounder, rifled 32 pounder or the Confederate Brook rifle. Projectile measures: diameter 6.2 in., length 8 in., weight 40 lbs. Individual balls will measure 2.875in. approximately, the balls are often irregular. Dug projectile, all parts original this has never been taken apart, the rope is reproduction for display enhancement.. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting, never had a bursting charge. This was one of the stands found in an abandoned battery by Jim Nall, as published in the NSTVol VI No 3 March April 1979, pg. 26.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 105.


Artillery projectile, stand of grape, 32 pounder, or rifle 6.4in., fragments.

A0137...Artillery projectile, stand of grape, 32 pounder, or rifle 6.4in., ball from 32 pounder stand of grape.
The 32 pounder gun was a heavy immobile defensive weapon. These two balls, approximately 3 in. were both found on the Third Battle of Winchester which was a relative fast moving mostly cavalry engagement in 1864. There were 32 pounder rifles at Fort Milroy, which the Confederates captured in Second Winchester, 1863, it is entirely possible that they tried to salvage these balls from abandoned stock a year later in the 1864 capaign, when supplies were desperate. The balls might seem to fit a 3 inch rifle, however, since the balls are not round, this would not have worked out well. So it is speculated that they were either discarded in the 1864 engagement or used with rags or paper to fire from the 6 or 12 pounder smoothbores. Recovered: Third Battle of Winchester, by Harry Ridgeway, and Steve Baker.
Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia


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