Ridgeway Civil War Research Center,
A virtual examination of artifacts of the American Civil War


Civil War Artillery

by Harry Ridgeway


Rifled artillery projectile, Burton design, 3in.
Artillery 3710 Burton 3in.

This is the "Ridgeway Civil War Research Center...", a research tool for educational purposes only, and is provided at no cost to the reader. Some of the relics listed are retained in the author's collection, most reside in other collections and are not owned by the author. None of the items listed in this section are for sale, please refer to relicman.com sales listings for items offered for sale. This is a work in progress, I list items as I get to them, there are many patterns that are not listed yet, this list will be regularly updated as I get pictures and descriptions for more items. I will also correct mistakes, so if you see any please tell me. All items listed are believed to be authentic to the Civil War or as otherwise described. Any excavated relics have been recovered from private property with owners permission. This information is available for research purposes, pictures may be used by permission only.
All projectiles listed have been disarmed.

Most information on this page is from:
Field Artillery Projectiles of the American Civil War, 1993 Edition. by Thomas S. Dickey and Peter C. George.
Civil War Heavy Explosive Ordnance, A Guide to Large Artillery Prjectiles, Torpedoes, and Mines, by Jack Bell.
Artillery Fuses of the Civil War, by Charles H. Jones.
Pictures are by the author, unless otherwise indicated
.
Weapons used
Confederate rifle, 3.in.
Caliber of the gun is 3.0in., 7 grooves, (apparently copied from Federal 3 in. Ordnance rifle), projectile diameter should measure 2.94 in. approximately, variations will be found.


Artillery 3711 Burton bolt 3in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Burton design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, pattern with smooth sides, copper band sabot, Confederate rifle, 3in.
Projectile was Confederate manufactured following James H Burton's design. The sabot system utilized was a long copper band sabot, notched into the base of the projectile. The pattern originally had a lead sabot, apparently all of the lead sabots were removed and replaced with the copper ring sabot. Both Burton and Dyer patterns were used at First Manasssas, and for years the Dyers with lead sabots were incorrectly identified as Burton. Col E.P. Alexander, an early observer and analyst had recovered samples of the projectiles with lead sabots from Manassas and incorrectly identifed them as Burton, this probably because the Burtons were supposed to also have lead sabots. However only the Dyers actually had lead sabots and the Burton projectiles in the field had copper sabots. Because he was a contemporary observer, nobody questioned this identification. The mystery was solved when researchers (Pete George) determined that period reports indicated that Dyers were used in large quantities at Manassas yet, none were showing up and period diagrams for Dyer were also discovered showing the lead sabots. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 10.6lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 139.

A0040...Rifled artillery projectile, Burton design, Confederate manufacture, solid bolt, pattern with smooth sides, copper band sabot, Confederate rifle, 3in.
Projectile was Confederate manufactured following James H Burton's design. The sabot system utilized was a long copper band sabot, notched into the base of the projectile. The pattern originally had a lead sabot, apparently all of the lead sabots were removed and replaced with the copper ring sabot. Both Burton and Dyer patterns were used at First Manasssas, and for years the Dyers with lead sabots were incorrectly identified as Burton. Col E.P. Alexander, an early observer and analyst had recovered samples of the projectiles with lead sabots from Manassas and incorrectly identifed them as Burton, this probably because the Burtons were supposed to also have lead sabots. However only the Dyers actually had lead sabots and the Burton projectiles in the field had copper sabots. Because he was a contemporary observer, nobody questioned this identification. The mystery was solved when researchers (Pete George) determined that period reports indicated that Dyers were used in large quantities at Manassas yet, none were showing up and period diagrams for Dyer were also discovered showing the lead sabots. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 10.6lbs. Sabot is fired showing 7 lands and grooves, and is intact. Metal is solid, minor areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed: solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. There are traces of the original lead filling a small hole in the base. Recovered: Manassas, Virginia.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 139., this is the example published.


and now a word from our sponsor.....

Civil War Relicman, Harry Ridgeway,
Civil War artillery, Relicman sales catalog.
Click here for artillery for sale.

artillery sales catalog.