Ridgeway Civil War Research Center,
A virtual examination of artifacts of the American Civil War


Civil War Artillery

by Harry Ridgeway


Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, 3in.
Artillery 4010 Dyer 3in.

This is the "Ridgeway Civil War Research Center...", a research tool for educational purposes only, and is provided at no cost to the reader. Some of the relics listed are retained in the author's collection, most reside in other collections and are not owned by the author. None of the items listed in this section are for sale, please refer to relicman.com sales listings for items offered for sale. This is a work in progress, I list items as I get to them, there are many patterns that are not listed yet, this list will be regularly updated as I get pictures and descriptions for more items. I will also correct mistakes, so if you see any please tell me. All items listed are believed to be authentic to the Civil War or as otherwise described. Any excavated relics have been recovered from private property with owners permission. This information is available for research purposes, pictures may be used by permission only.
All projectiles listed have been disarmed.

Most information on this page is from:
Field Artillery Projectiles of the American Civil War, 1993 Edition. by Thomas S. Dickey and Peter C. George.
Civil War Heavy Explosive Ordnance, A Guide to Large Artillery Prjectiles, Torpedoes, and Mines, by Jack Bell.
Artillery Fuses of the Civil War, by Charles H. Jones.
Pictures are by the author, unless otherwise indicated.

Weapons used:
Ordnance rifle, 3.in. Caliber of the gun is 3.0in., 7 grooves, projectile diameter should measure 2.94 in. approximately, variations will be found.


Artillery 4011 bolt three flanges Dyer 3in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, experimental round, lead cup sabot with pre-cast flanges, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This experimental pattern features the sabot with pre-cast flanges, later models did not include this feature. This bolt was designed with a flat nose, presumably to leave room for a fuze eventually, but the development never went that far. The size of this projectile suggests that it was intended for the 3 in Ordnance Rifle. However the three flanges suggest that this may have been designed to use in the Parrott rifle, however the diameter of the projectile is too wide to fit the smaller 2.9in. Parrott 10 pounder. This discrepency in the size may explain why this design was not advanced. Projectile measures: diameter 2.9in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 10lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George (93 edition) pg. 149.

A1244. Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, experimental round, lead cup sabot with pre-cast flanges, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This experimental pattern features the sabot with pre-cast flanges, later models did not include this feature. This bolt was designed with a flat nose, presumably to leave room for a fuze eventually, but the development never went that far. Projectile measures: diameter 2.9in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 10lbs. Projectile is not fired, sabot intact. Projectile is disarmed, casting is solid iron without a bursting chamber. Recovered: surplus stocks.
Ref: Dickey & George (93 edition) pg. 149.


Artillery 4012 shell percussion fuze Dyer 3in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), rounded nose, lead cup sabot, without flame grooves, Schenkl rounded head percussion fuze early pattern, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system >utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, no flame grooves were cut into the sabot, this came later. Nose of the shell is rounded, the sabot on this early pattern has iron straps imbedded on the bottom, probably to secure the powder bag. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs . with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is a "common" shell, (standard), it does not contain balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Schenkl brass percussion fuze, early version with rounded flange, Jones pg. 98 lower right. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 8lbs. to 9lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 144.

A0753...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), rounded nose, lead cup sabot, without flame grooves, Schenkl rounded head percussion fuze early pattern, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system >utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, no flame grooves were cut into the sabot, this came later. Nose of the shell is rounded, the sabot on this early pattern has iron straps imbedded on the bottom, probably to secure the powder bag. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs . with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is a "common" shell, (standard), it does not contain balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Schenkl brass percussion fuze, early version with rounded flange, Jones pg. 98 lower right. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 10lbs. This shell could contain case shot balls, based on its heavy weight, however this would be unexpected with a percussion fuze in this pattern. Lead cup sabot is unfired. Percussion fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole in the side. Recovered: Atlanta campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 144.

A1254...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), rounded nose, lead cup sabot, without flame grooves, Schenkl rounded head percussion fuze early pattern, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system >utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, no flame grooves were cut into the sabot, this came later. Nose of the shell is rounded, the sabot on this early pattern has iron straps imbedded on the bottom, probably to secure the powder bag. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs . with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is a "common" shell, (standard), it does not contain balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Schenkl brass percussion fuze, early version with rounded flange, Jones pg. 98 lower right. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight not determined. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Percussion fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole in the side. Recovered: Chancellorsville, Virginia.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 144.

A1918...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), rounded nose, lead cup sabot, without flame grooves, Schenkl rounded head percussion fuze early pattern, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system >utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, no flame grooves were cut into the sabot, this came later. Nose of the shell is rounded, the sabot on this early pattern has iron straps imbedded on the bottom, probably to secure the powder bag. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs . with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is a "common" shell, (standard), it does not contain balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Schenkl brass percussion fuze, early version with rounded flange, Jones pg. 98 lower right. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 7.9lbs. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Percussion fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole in the side. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 144.

A2315...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), rounded nose, lead cup sabot, without flame grooves, Schenkl rounded head percussion fuze early pattern, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system >utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, no flame grooves were cut into the sabot, this came later. Nose of the shell is rounded, the sabot on this early pattern has iron straps imbedded on the bottom, probably to secure the powder bag. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs . with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is a "common" shell, (standard), it does not contain balls, and with a percussion fuze it was designed to detonate after striking enemy cannon or equipment. Fuze employed was a Schenkl brass percussion fuze, early version with rounded flange, Jones pg. 98 lower right. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 8lbs. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Percussion fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole in the side. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 144.


Artillery 4013 shell common with flame grooves time fuze Dyer 3in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze , Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls , with a time fuze shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for common shell will have a large opening into the chamber, Jones , Fuzes, pg. 36, right. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 8lbs. to 9lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A0390...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze , Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls , with a time fuze shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for common shell will have a large opening into the chamber, Jones , Fuzes, pg. 36, right. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 8lbs. Fired sabot intact showing 7 lands & grooves. Dyer time fuze is partially intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Battle of Brandy Station, Virginia.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A1552...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze , Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls , with a time fuze shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for common shell will have a large opening into the chamber, Jones , Fuzes, pg. 36, right. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 8.0lb. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Dyer time fuze is intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Malvern Hill, Virginia.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A1758...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze , Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls , with a time fuze shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for common shell will have a large opening into the chamber, Jones , Fuzes, pg. 36, right. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 8.0lb. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle and is partial. Dyer time fuze is intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A2757...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze , Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls , with a time fuze shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for common shell will have a large opening into the chamber, Jones , Fuzes, pg. 36, right. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 6.2lbs., without sabot. Lead cup sabot separated on firing. Cross grooves on bottom are visible. Dyer time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.


Artillery 4014 shell irregular flame grooves Dyer 3in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with irregular flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is rounded. A few of these shells have irregular groove around the top and flame grooves are rough cut and irregular. The sabots may have been recast or this could have been early production, before better techniques for cutting the flame groove and lubricating groove were developed. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls , with a time fuze shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for common shell will have a large opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, right. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 8lbs. to 9lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A2534...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with irregular flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is rounded. A few of these shells have irregular groove around the top and flame grooves are rough cut and irregular. The sabots may have been recast or this could have been early production, before better techniques for cutting the flame groove and lubricating groove were developed. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls , with a time fuze shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for common shell will have a large opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, right. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 8lbs. Lead cup sabot is un-fired. Dyer time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.


Artillery 4015 shell case shot without flame grooves Dyer 3in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot", rounded nose, lead cup sabot, without flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze , Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, no flame grooves were cut into the sabot, this came later. Nose of the shell is rounded, the sabot on this early pattern has iron straps imbedded on the bottom, probably to secure the powder bag. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs . with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is" case shot", explosive charge with lead balls , and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones , Fuzes, pg. 36 , left. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 10lbs. to 11lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A2469...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot", rounded nose, lead cup sabot, without flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze , Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, no flame grooves were cut into the sabot, this came later. Nose of the shell is rounded, the sabot on this early pattern has iron straps imbedded on the bottom, probably to secure the powder bag. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs . with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is" case shot", explosive charge with lead balls , and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones , Fuzes, pg. 36 , left. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 10lbs. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Metal solid, sabot and time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Malvern Hill, Virginia by Frank Clayton 7/8/01.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.


Artillery 4016 shell case shot with lead balls sulfur matrix Dyer 3in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot" balls packed in sulfur matrix, rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze, nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead balls are packed in yellow or sulfur matrix. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, left. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 9.5lbs. to 11lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A0042. Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot" balls packed in sulfur matrix, rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze, nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead balls are packed in yellow or sulfur matrix. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, left. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight tbd. Lead cup sabot was separated during firing and is missing. Shell cracked during flight but did not break, eventually a piece broke off exposing the interior with lead balls packed in sulfur matrix. Projectile is disarmed, broken section exposes interior. Recovered: Fredericksburg, Virginia.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A1551. Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot" balls packed in sulfur matrix, rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
A1551.jpg (18160 bytes) A1551B.jpg (19518 bytes) A1551C.jpg (11641 bytes) A1551D.jpg (10155 bytes) Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze, nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead balls are packed in yellow or sulfur matrix. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, left. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 10lbs. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Dyer time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Shiloh Tennessee.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A1553. Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot" balls packed in sulfur matrix, rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze, nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead balls are packed in yellow or sulfur matrix. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, left. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight not determined. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Dyer time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A2638. Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot" balls packed in sulfur matrix, rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze, nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead balls are packed in yellow or sulfur matrix. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, left. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze),weight 10.1lbs. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Dyer time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A2723. Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot" balls packed in sulfur matrix, rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze, nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead balls are packed in yellow or sulfur matrix. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, left. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze),weight 9.3lbs. Note the weight of this shell is light for case and heavy for common, it appears to contain a light load of balls. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Dyer time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A2792. Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot" balls packed in sulfur matrix, rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze, nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead balls are packed in yellow or sulfur matrix. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, left. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 10.1lbs. Projectile is cut showing cross section. Dyer time fuze is partial. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell exposes interior. Recovered: Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.
Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia

A2802. Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot" balls packed in sulfur matrix, rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze, nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead balls are packed in yellow or sulfur matrix. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, left. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 10.3lbs. Projectile is cut showing cross section. Dyer time fuze is partial. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell exposes interior. Recovered: Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A2890. Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot" balls packed in sulfur matrix, rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze, nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead balls are packed in yellow or sulfur matrix. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, left. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight not meaningful. Projectile is cut showing cross section. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle, sabot is partial. Dyer time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, cut shell exposes everything. Recovered: Virginia campaign.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.

A2976. Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "case shot" balls packed in sulfur matrix, rounded nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze, nose of the shell is rounded. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is "case shot", explosive charge with lead balls, and with a time fuze was designed to detonate above the heads of troops in the open field. Lead balls are packed in yellow or sulfur matrix. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for case shot will have a small opening into the chamber, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 36, left. Projectile measures: diameter 2.94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 10lbs. Lead cup sabot is firing showing faint rifling. Dyer time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through paper section of time fuze. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 145.


Artillery 4017 shell pointed nose Dyer 3in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), pointed nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze , Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is pointed. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for common shell will have a large opening into the chamber, Jones , Fuzes, pg. 36 , right. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 8lbs. to 9lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 146.

A0043...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), pointed nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze , Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is pointed. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for common shell will have a large opening into the chamber, Jones , Fuzes, pg. 36 , right. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 6.0lbs. empty. Fired sabot intact showing 7 lands & grooves. Dyer time fuze missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Route 522 near airport, Winchester Virginia, by Steve Baker.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 146.
Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia

A1548...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), pointed nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze , Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is pointed. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for common shell will have a large opening into the chamber, Jones , Fuzes, pg. 36 , right. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 10.1lb. Lead cup sabot is un-fired. Dyer time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Cedar Mountain, Virginia.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 146.

A2879...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), pointed nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Dyer zinc time fuze , Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is pointed. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11lbs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Dyer zinc time fuze, with spanner holes, and without a flange, the time fuze for common shell will have a large opening into the chamber, Jones , Fuzes, pg. 36 , right. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 9.3lbs. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Metal solid, crack in side is probably stress from firing. Dyer time fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 146.


Artillery 4018 lead sabot with middle groove Dyer 3in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot middle groove and deep cup, threaded for a time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a deep cup into the bottom, and a groove around the middle, nose of the shell is pointed. Fuze hole is threaded for Taylor time fuze. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 8.2in. (excluding fuze), weight not determined. Pattern is believed to have been manufactured after the Civil War.
Ref: Melton & Pawl Fig III B10.

A1547...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot middle groove and deep cup, threaded for a time fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a deep cup into the bottom, and a groove around the middle, nose of the shell is pointed. Fuze hole is threaded for Taylor time fuze. Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 8.2in. (excluding fuze), weight not determined. Pattern is believed to have been manufactured after the Civil War. Lead cup sabot is unfired. Recovered: surplus stocks.
Ref: Melton & Pawl Fig III B10.


Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, fragments

A0200.23...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, fragments
Fragments are from 3 inch Dyers, these were generally used in the early campaigns in the Shenandoah Valley. Recovered: Shenandoah Valley, Virginia 1864 campaign, by Harry Ridgeway.
Ridgeway collection, Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia

A2180...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, fragments with Schenkl percussion fuze, Dyer nose.
Dyer nose section with fuze intact, good display with scarce fuze.




Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), pointed nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Schenkl, percussion fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is pointed. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11bs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Schenkl Army percussion fuze , removable cap had a slider and percussion cap, head is 1.22in.or 1.25in., 10 threads per inch, marked "JP SCHENKL / PAT OCT 16 1861", (Jones pg. 98 or 99). Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight 8lbs. to 9lbs.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 146.
Do not publish, hold for better example.

A2714...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, "common" (standard), pointed nose, lead cup sabot, with flame grooves, Schenkl, percussion fuze, Ordnance rifle, 3in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base This pattern features the sabot with a concave bottom, and a groove around the top, three flame grooves were cut into the sabot so that flame from firing would pass through the sabot and ignite the fuze , nose of the shell is pointed. Some of these shells were configured as case shot (approx 10lbs to 11bs. with balls ), or as "common" (approx 8lbs. to 9lbs. without balls). This shell is " common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against troops in the open field or enemy cannon. Fuze employed was a Schenkl Army percussion fuze , removable cap had a slider and percussion cap, head is 1.22in.or 1.25in., 10 threads per inch, marked "JP SCHENKL / PAT OCT 16 1861", (Jones pg. 98 or 99). Projectile measures: diameter 2. 94in., length 7in. (excluding fuze), weight casing 5.0lbs., sabot 1.5lbs. Lead cup sabot shows seven lands and grooves, fired from the Ordnance rifle. Metal solid, sabot is separated from shell body and may be parts from two different shells, Schenkl fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the bottom. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Dickey & George, Field Artillery (1993 Edition), pg. 146
Do not publish, hold for better example.


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