Ridgeway Civil War Research Center,
A virtual examination of artifacts of the American Civil War


Civil War Artillery

by Harry Ridgeway


Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, 7in.
Artillery 4030 Dyer 7in.

This is the "Ridgeway Civil War Research Center...", a research tool for educational purposes only, and is provided at no cost to the reader. Some of the relics listed are retained in the author's collection, most reside in other collections and are not owned by the author. None of the items listed in this section are for sale, please refer to relicman.com sales listings for items offered for sale. This is a work in progress, I list items as I get to them, there are many patterns that are not listed yet, this list will be regularly updated as I get pictures and descriptions for more items. I will also correct mistakes, so if you see any please tell me. All items listed are believed to be authentic to the Civil War or as otherwise described. Any excavated relics have been recovered from private property with owners permission. This information is available for research purposes, pictures may be used by permission only.
All projectiles listed have been disarmed.

Most information on this page is from:
Field Artillery Projectiles of the American Civil War, 1993 Edition. by Thomas S. Dickey and Peter C. George.
Civil War Heavy Explosive Ordnance, A Guide to Large Artillery Prjectiles, Torpedoes, and Mines, by Jack Bell.
Artillery Fuses of the Civil War, by Charles H. Jones.
Pictures are by the author, unless otherwise indicated.

Weapons used:
Rifled 42 pounder gun, 7in. Caliber of the gun is 7.0in., 15 grooves, projectile diameter should measure 6.9in. approximately, variations will be found.
Rifled 42 pounder gun, 7in. Caliber of the gun is 7.0in., 9 grooves, projectile diameter should measure 6.9in. approximately, variations will be found.


Artillery 4031 shell wood fuze Dyer 7in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, wood time fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight approx. 80lbs. with sabot, 65lbs. without sabot. Most of these 7in. Dyers were used by the Federal gunboats in the assault of Island No 10, a Confederate stronghold in the middle of the Mississippi River, the island washed away years ago by the river and these shells are found in the flood plain having sailed well past the target.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.

A0147...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, wood time fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight 82lbs. Lead cup sabot intact, shows rifling, and dent from impact, this is not an axe cut. Wood time fuze is missing. Projectile is disarmed open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Island No 10, a Confederate stronghold in the middle of the Mississippi River, the island washed away years ago by the river and these shells are found in the flood plain having sailed well past the target. Island 10.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.

A1755...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, wood time fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight approx. 80lbs. Lead cup sabot intact, shows rifling, and dent from impact, this is not an axe cut. Wood time fuze is missing. Projectile is disarmed open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Island No 10, a Confederate stronghold in the middle of the Mississippi River, the island washed away years ago by the river and these shells are found in the flood plain having sailed well past the target. Island 10.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.

A2007...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, wood time fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight approx. 80lbs. Lead cup sabot intact, shows rifling. Wood time fuze is missing. Projectile is disarmed open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Island No 10, a Confederate stronghold in the middle of the Mississippi River, the island washed away years ago by the river and these shells are found in the flood plain having sailed well past the target. Island 10.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.

A2170...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, wood time fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight approx. 80lbs. Lead cup sabot intact, shows rifling. Wood time fuze is missing. Projectile is disarmed open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Island No 10, a Confederate stronghold in the middle of the Mississippi River, the island washed away years ago by the river and these shells are found in the flood plain having sailed well past the target. Island 10.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.

A2172...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, wood time fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight approx. 80lbs. with sabot, 65lbs. without sabot. Lead cup sabot seperated on firing plus a stress crack. Wood time fuze is missing. Projectile is disarmed open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Island No 10, a Confederate stronghold in the middle of the Mississippi River, the island washed away years ago by the river and these shells are found in the flood plain having sailed well past the target. Island 10.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.

A2178. Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, wood time fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight approx. 80lbs. Lead cup sabot intact, shows rifling and axe cut. Wood time fuze is missing. Projectile is disarmed open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Island No 10, a Confederate stronghold in the middle of the Mississippi River, the island washed away years ago by the river and these shells are found in the flood plain having sailed well past the target. Island 10.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.

A2533...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, wood time fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight approx. 80lbs. Lead cup sabot intact, shows rifling. Wood time fuze is missing. Projectile is disarmed open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Island No 10, a Confederate stronghold in the middle of the Mississippi River, the island washed away years ago by the river and these shells are found in the flood plain having sailed well past the target. Island 10.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.

A2774...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, wood time fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight approx. 80lbs. Lead cup sabot intact, shows rifling. Wood time fuze is partial. Projectile is disarmed open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Island No 10, a Confederate stronghold in the middle of the Mississippi River, the island washed away years ago by the river and these shells are found in the flood plain having sailed well past the target. Island 10.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.

A2823...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, wood time fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight approx. 80lbs.Lead cup sabot intact, shows rifling. Wood time fuze is partial. Projectile is disarmed open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Island No 10, a Confederate stronghold in the middle of the Mississippi River, the island washed away years ago by the river and these shells are found in the flood plain having sailed well past the target. Island 10.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.

A2916...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, wood time fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a wood time fuze, Jones Fuzes pg. 2. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight approx. 80lbs. with sabot, 65lbs. without sabot. Lead cup sabot seperated on firing. Wood time fuze is partial. Projectile is disarmed drill hole through the paper section of the time fuze. Recovered: Island No 10, a Confederate stronghold in the middle of the Mississippi River, the island washed away years ago by the river and these shells are found in the flood plain having sailed well past the target. Island 10.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.


Artillery 4032 Dyer shell percussion fuze 7in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, Parrott "improved one part" percussion fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a Parrott zinc "improved" one part design, with a flange, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 81, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight approx. 80lbs. with sabot, 65lbs. without sabot.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.

A2979...Rifled artillery projectile, Dyer design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, pointed nose, lead cup sabot, Parrott "improved one part" percussion fuze, rifled 42 pounder gun 7in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following the invention of Alexander Dyer. The sabot system utilized was an expanding lead cup around the base. This pattern features a massive lead sabot with a concave bottom, nose of the shell is pointed. This shell is "common", (standard), explosive charge only without lead balls, with a time fuze, shell could be used against enemy cannon or troops defending a fort. The massive lead sabot was problematic, it tended to foul the cannons, and often it would block passage of the flame to the paper time fuze. To remedy this, the sabots on some were chopped with an axe, this to clear a flame path to the fuze. Fuze employed was a Parrott zinc "improved" one part design, with a flange, Jones, Fuzes, pg. 81, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat. Projectile measures: diameter 6.9in., length 13.75in., weight approx. 80lbs. with sabot, weight 66lbs., without sabot. Lead cup sabot was seperated on firing. Parrott "improved one part fuze intact. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through side. Recovered: believed to be James River, Virginia, but this is not confirmed.
Ref: Bell, Heavy Ordnance, pg. 224.


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