Ridgeway Civil War Research Center,
A virtual examination of artifacts of the American Civil War


Civil War Artillery
by Harry Ridgeway

Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, 6.4in.
Artillery 4710 Parrott 6.4in.

This is the "Ridgeway Civil War Research Center...", a research tool for educational purposes only, and is provided at no cost to the reader. Some of the relics listed are retained in the author's collection, most reside in other collections and are not owned by the author. None of the items listed in this section are for sale, please refer to relicman.com sales listings for items offered for sale. This is a work in progress, I list items as I get to them, there are many patterns that are not listed yet, this list will be regularly updated as I get pictures and descriptions for more items. I will also correct mistakes, so if you see any please tell me. All items listed are believed to be authentic to the Civil War or as otherwise described. Any excavated relics have been recovered from private property with owners permission. This information is available for research purposes, pictures may be used by permission only.
All projectiles listed have been disarmed.

Most information on this page is from:
Field Artillery Projectiles of the American Civil War, 1993 Edition. by Thomas S. Dickey and Peter C. George.
Civil War Heavy Explosive Ordnance, A Guide to Large Artillery Prjectiles, Torpedoes, and Mines, by Jack Bell.
Artillery Fuses of the Civil War, by Charles H. Jones.
Pictures are by the author, unless otherwise indicated.

Weapons used
Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Caliber of the gun is 6.4in., 9 grooves, projectile diameter should measure 6.25in. approximately, variations will be found.

Artillery 4711 Parrott bolt long pattern flat top 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, long pattern with "flat top", high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 13in., weight 95lbs.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 290.

A0832...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, pattern with "flat top", high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 13in., weight 95lbs. High band sabot is not fired. Metal solid with some pitting. Projectile is disarmed, casting is solid iron. Recovered: Portsmouth Virginia, a large number of shells were apparently recycled for metal during WWII, a few were saved.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 290.

A2157...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, pattern with "flat top", high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 13in., weight 95lbs. Sabot is marked "PATENTED 1861". High band sabot is not fired. Metal solid with some pitting. Projectile is disarmed, casting is solid iron. Recovered: Portsmouth Virginia, a large number of shells were apparently recycled for metal during WWII, a few were saved.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 290.


Artillery 4712 Parrott bolt long pattern chill nose 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, long pattern with wide chill nose, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. This bolt was designed with an indented area around the nose with a flat top, this is sometimes referred to as "bottle nose', it is a variation of the chill nose employed in smaller calibers. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 13in., weight 95lbs.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 295.

A2440...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, pattern with wide chill nose, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. This bolt was designed with an indented area around the nose with a flat top, this is sometimes referred to as "bottle nose', it is a variation of the chill nose employed in smaller calibers. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 13in., weight 95lbs. Sabot is marked "PATENTED 1861". High band sabot shows 9 lands and grooves, fired from Parrott rifle, sabot is partial. Metal solid with some pitting, nose chip is from impact. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Charleston South Carolina.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 295.

A2966...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, pattern with wide chill nose, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. This bolt was designed with an indented area around the nose with a flat top, this is sometimes referred to as "bottle nose', it is a variation of the chill nose employed in smaller calibers. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 13in., weight 95lbs. High band sabot separated on firing. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed, solid iron casting never had a cavity or bursting charge. Recovered: Charleston South Carolina.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 295.


Artillery 4713 Parrott bolt long pattern hollow shot 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, hollow shot bolt, pattern with "flat top", high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. This bolt is cast with a hollow cavity, threaded hole on bottom was plugged to close the core after casting. The purpose is not entirely clear, perhaps the lighter bolt would have longer effective firing range. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 13in., weight 75lbs.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 291.

A2549...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, hollow shot bolt, pattern with "flat top", high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.

Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. This bolt is cast with a hollow cavity, threaded hole on bottom was plugged to close the core after casting. The purpose is not entirely clear, perhaps the lighter bolt would have longer effective firing range. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 13in., weight 75lbs. High band sabot separated on firing. Metal quality is solid, early pickup, missing the sabot. There are two cut marks on the side, this may have been an attempt to expose the open core or to cut the bottom off, however it was too close to the bottom and did not penetrate the core. This was found in a very old Charleston, South Carolina collection of antiques, the cuts were fully rusted over and not observed until shell was cleaned. Whether shell was actually fired in the Charleston siege is not known, it is a rare pattern thought to have only been tested at Fort Fisher, but if that is the case why did it end up in Charleston? Projectile is disarmed, iron casting has a cavity but it could not have been filled with powder, projectile now is cut exposing empty cavity.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 291.


Artillery 4714 Parrott bolt short pattern chill nose 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, short pattern with narrow chill nose, high band brass sabot, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. This bolt was designed with an indented area around the nose with a flat top, this is sometimes referred to as "bottle nose', it is a variation of the chill nose employed in smaller calibers. Projectile measures: diameter 6.3in., length 9.75in. (excluding fuze), weight 61lbs.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 294.

A0168...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, solid bolt, pattern with narrow chill nose, high band brass sabot, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. This bolt was designed with an indented area around the nose with a flat top, this is sometimes referred to as "bottle nose', it is a variation of the chill nose employed in smaller calibers. Projectile measures: diameter 6.3in., length 9.75in. (excluding fuze), weight 61lbs. High band sabot is not fired. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed, casting is solid iron. Recovered: surplus stocks.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 294.


Artillery 4715 Parrott shell short pattern experimental 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short test pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 12 rabbets, experimental pattern without fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 12 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Shell was apparently experimental, it was cast with a cavity and a fuze hole, but the fuze hole was never drilled or threaded to take a fuze. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 13in. (excluding fuze), weight 60lbs. approx. with sabot.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance., not listed.

A2775...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short test pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 12 rabbets, experimental pattern without fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 12 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Shell was apparently experimental, it was cast with a cavity and a fuze hole, but the fuze hole was never drilled or threaded to take a fuze. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 13in. (excluding fuze), weight 60lbs. approx. with sabot. High band sabot is fired showing faint rifling, this shell did not grab the rifling which is probably why this design was rejected. Fuze hole is not threaded or milled. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole, cavity was never loaded with powder and is filled with foundry sand. Recovered: not known, probably West Point test range but this is not confirmed.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance., not listed.

A0471...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short test pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 12 rabbets, experimental pattern without fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 12 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Shell was apparently experimental, it was cast with a cavity and a fuze hole, but the fuze hole was never drilled or threaded to take a fuze. Projectile measures: diameter 6.36in., length 13.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 53lbs., without sabot. High band sabot separated on firing. Fuze hole is not threaded or milled. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole, cavity was never loaded with powder and is filled with foundry sand. Recovered: not known, probably West Point test range but this is not confirmed.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance., not listed.


Artillery 4716.1 Parrott shell high band sabot short pattern flat bottom percussion fuze 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Fuze employed was Parrott zinc one part percussion fuze, "improved" design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 80lbs. approx. with sabot.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

A1112. Parrott Type II Short Shell - 100 Pounder 6.4in
High band brass sabot intact shows faint rifling, Parrott watercap fuze intact. Recovered: Morris Island SC Diameter 6.3 in., length 15.75 in. Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

Not treated.

A2700...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern without rivet, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Bottom is flat, use of rivets to center the core were apparently introduced later. This "short" pattern may have been designed to be able utilize case shot, but it appears that most were configured with percussion fuzes and full powder charge. Fuze employed was Parrott zinc one part percussion fuze, "improved" design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 75lbs. approx. with base chip and missing sabot. High band brass sabot and base chip separated on firing. Parrott percussion fuze is partial, shows nipple. Metal stable, projectile was recovered from wet ground and has been conserved. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the bottom. Recovered: North Carolina defenses.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

A2808...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern without rivet, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Bottom is flat, use of rivets to center the core were apparently introduced later. This "short" pattern may have been designed to be able utilize case shot, but it appears that most were configured with percussion fuzes and full powder charge. Fuze employed was Parrott zinc one part percussion fuze, "improved" design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 80lbs. approx., missing sabot. High band brass sabot separated on firing. Parrott improved one part fuze is partial. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed, drill holes through bottom and side. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.


Artillery 4716.2 Parrott shell high band sabot short pattern flat bottom watercap time fuze 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott watercap fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Fuze employed was a Parrott watercap time fuze, brass watercap is screwed into white metal sleeve, edge of the fuze hole is milled thin, Jones pg. 13. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 80lbs. approx. with sabot.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

A2624...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets,Parrott watercap fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Fuze employed was a Parrott watercap fuze, brass watercap is screwed into white metal sleeve, edge of the fuze hole is milled thin, Jones pg. 13. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 77lbs. approx. with sabot. High band sabot separated on firing. Parrott watercap fuze intact. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole on the bottom. Recovered: North Carolina defenses.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.


Artillery 4716.9 Parrott shell, high band sabot, short pattern, flat bottom, threaded fuze 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, threaded fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Fuze employed was probably a Parrott watercap or percussion fuze, edge of the fuze hole is milled thin. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 80lbs. approx. with sabot.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

A1124...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets,threaded fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Fuze employed was probably a Parrott watercap or percussion fuze, edge of the fuze hole is milled thin. Projectile measures: diameter 6.36in., length 15in. (excluding fuze), weight 79lb. High band brass sabot shows strong rifling, 9 lands & grooves, most fired examples of these heavy Parrott are missing the sabot. Parrott zinc fuze is partial. Metal solid with areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: city of Charleston SC, it was dug from a trash dump near Market Street! Projectile may have come from the battery, "Swamp Angel".
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

A1647...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets,threaded fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Fuze employed was probably a Parrott watercap or percussion fuze, edge of the fuze hole is milled thin. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 80lbs. approx. with sabot., not verified. High band brass sabot separated on firing. Parrott zinc fuze is partial. Metal solid with areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through damaged center of percussion fuze. Recovered: Charleston, South Carolina.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

A2307...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets,threaded fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Fuze employed was probably a Parrott watercap or percussion fuze, edge of the fuze hole is milled thin. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 80lbs. approx. with sabot. High band brass sabot is not fired. Threaded fuze is missing. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Metal solid with areas of pitting. Recovered: Key West, Florida, shells discarded after the war.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

A2364...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets,threaded fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Fuze employed was probably a Parrott watercap or percussion fuze, edge of the fuze hole is milled thin. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight not determined. High band brass sabot separated on firing. Threaded fuze missing. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior. Recovered: Battery Dantzler, Drewerys Bluff, Virginia.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

A2459...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets,threaded fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Fuze employed was probably a Parrott watercap or percussion fuze, edge of the fuze hole is milled thin. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 80lbs. approx. with sabot. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 82lbs. High band brass sabot separated on firing. Parrott time fuze with a flange has been added to this shell and is removable by hand. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole in the side and removable fuze exposes the empty interior. Recovered: Battery Dantzler, Drewerys Bluff, Virginia.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.


Artillery 4717.1 Parrott shell, high band sabot, short pattern, rivet on bottom, Parrott percussion fuze 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with rivet, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Bottom is plugged with a rivet protruding from the bottom. The shell was cast with an open hole in the base, through which a rod was placed to hold the core during casting. After casting the rod was removed, the rod was removed and replaced with a drive in plug, this while the casting was still hot. On cooling the hole would shrink thus securing the bottom plug. This "short" pattern may have been designed to be able utilize case shot, but it appears that most were configured with percussion fuzes and full powder charge. Fuze employed was Parrott zinc one part percussion fuze, "improved" design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 85lbs. approx. with sabot.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

A2299...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with rivet, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Bottom is plugged with a rivet protruding from the bottom. The shell was cast with an open hole in the base, through which a rod was placed to hold the core during casting. After casting the rod was removed, the rod was removed and replaced with a drive in plug, this while the casting was still hot. On cooling the hole would shrink thus securing the bottom plug. This "short" pattern may have been designed to be able utilize case shot, but it appears that most were configured with percussion fuzes and full powder charge. Fuze employed was Parrott zinc one part percussion fuze, "improved" design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 80lbs. approx. without sabot. High band brass sabot was separated on firing. Parrott one part improved fuze is partial. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed drill hole through the side. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

A2448...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with rivet, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Bottom is plugged with a rivet protruding from the bottom. The shell was cast with an open hole in the base, through which a rod was placed to hold the core during casting. After casting the rod was removed, the rod was removed and replaced with a drive in plug, this while the casting was still hot. On cooling the hole would shrink thus securing the bottom plug. This "short" pattern may have been designed to be able utilize case shot, but it appears that most were configured with percussion fuzes and full powder charge. Fuze employed was Parrott zinc one part percussion fuze, "improved" design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding rivet and fuze), weight 85lbs. High band brass sabot was separated on firing. Parrott percussion fuze is missing. Metal stable, projectile was recovered from wet ground and has been conserved. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the side. Recovered: North Carolina defenses by Bennett Langley.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

A2458...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with rivet, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Bottom is plugged with a rivet protruding from the bottom. The shell was cast with an open hole in the base, through which a rod was placed to hold the core during casting. After casting the rod was removed, the rod was removed and replaced with a drive in plug, this while the casting was still hot. On cooling the hole would shrink thus securing the bottom plug. This "short" pattern may have been designed to be able utilize case shot, but it appears that most were configured with percussion fuzes and full powder charge. Fuze employed was Parrott zinc one part percussion fuze, "improved" design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 16in. (excluding rivet and fuze), weight 87lbs. High band brass sabot was separated on firing. Parrott improved one part percussion fuze is intact with minor loss. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed drill hole through the side. Recovered: Battery Dantzler, Drewerys Bluff, Virginia.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.


Artillery 4717.2 Parrott shell, high band sabot, short pattern, rivet on bottom, Schenkl percussion fuze 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with rivet, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Schenkl percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Bottom is plugged with a rivet protruding from the bottom. The shell was cast with an open hole in the base, through which a rod was placed to hold the core during casting. After casting the rod was removed, the rod was removed and replaced with a drive in plug, this while the casting was still hot. On cooling the hole would shrink thus securing the bottom plug. This "short" pattern may have been designed to be able utilize case shot, but it appears that most were configured with percussion fuzes and full powder charge. Fuze employed was large caliber Schenkl percussion intended to detonate upon striking enemy cannon or fortifications, fuze is marked "JP SCHENKL / PAT OCT 16 1861", Jones pg. 101. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 80lbs. approx. with sabot.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.

A2606...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, short pattern with rivet, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Schenkl percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Bottom is plugged with a rivet protruding from the bottom. The shell was cast with an open hole in the base, through which a rod was placed to hold the core during casting. After casting the rod was removed, the rod was removed and replaced with a drive in plug, this while the casting was still hot. On cooling the hole would shrink thus securing the bottom plug. This "short" pattern may have been designed to be able utilize case shot, but it appears that most were configured with percussion fuzes and full powder charge. Fuze employed was large caliber Schenkl percussion intended to detonate upon striking enemy cannon or fortifications, fuze is marked "JP SCHENKL / PAT OCT 16 1861", Jones pg. 101. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze and rivet), weight 80lbs. approx. with sabot. High band brass sabot separated on firing. Schenkl fuze intact. Metal quality is solid. Projectile is disarmed, two drill holes in the side, holes have been plugged with something soft and can be easily removed. Recovered: North Carolina defenses.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 297.


Artillery 4718.1 Parrott shell, high band sabot, long pattern, flat bottom, Parrott percussion fuze 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. This is the longest pattern produced for the 100 pounder rifle. Fuze employed was Parrott zinc one part percussion fuze, "improved" design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Projectile measures: diameter 6.3in., length 19in. (excluding fuze), weight 80lbs. approx. without sabot.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 298.

A2699...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. This is the longest pattern produced for the 100 pounder rifle. Fuze employed was Parrott zinc one part percussion fuze, "improved" design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Projectile measures: diameter 6.3in., length 19in. (excluding fuze), weight 80lbs. approx. without sabot. High band brass sabot separated on firing. Percussion fuze is partial. Metal solid. Projectile is disarmed, drill hole through the bottom. Recovered: North Carolina defenses.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 298.

A2963...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. This is the longest pattern produced for the 100 pounder rifle. Fuze employed was Parrott zinc one part percussion fuze, "improved" design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Projectile measures: diameter 6.3in., length 19in. (excluding fuze), weight 80lbs. approx. without sabot. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 15.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 78lbs. approx. with sabot. High band brass sabot is fired showing 9 lands and grooves. Threaded fuze was lost in restoration and is missing, (percussion). Metal is solid. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior, plus there are four drill holes on the side, it apparently had a white metal fuze when recovered that was lost in restoration or somebody was having a wonderful time drilling holes. The extra holes can be plugged if desired. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 298.


Artillery 4718.2 Parrott shell, high band sabot, long pattern, flat bottom, Parrott watercap time fuze 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott watercap fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Fuze employed was a Parrott watercap fuze, brass watercap is screwed into white metal sleeve, edge of the fuze hole is milled thin, Jones pg. 13. Projectile measures: diameter 6.3in., length 18.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 92lbs., approx. with sabot.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 298.

A0478...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with flat bottom, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott watercap fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Fuze employed was a Parrott watercap fuze, brass watercap is screwed into white metal sleeve, edge of the fuze hole is milled thin, Jones pg. 13. Projectile measures: diameter 6.3in., length 18.5in. (excluding fuze), weight 92lbs., approx. with sabot. Sabot intact showing 9 lands and grooves, it is rare for the fired sabot to be intact as almost all of these flew off on firing. Sleeve for Navy watercap fuze is present. Metal is solid with areas of pitting. Recovered: Mathias, Virginia which is along the Potomac near Washington.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 298.


Artillery 4719.1 Parrott shell, high band sabot, long pattern, rivet on bottom, Parrott percussion fuze 6.4in.
Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with rivet, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Bottom is plugged with a rivet protruding from the bottom. The shell was cast with an open hole in the base, through which a rod was placed to hold the core during casting. After casting the rod was removed, the rod was removed and replaced with a drive in plug, this while the casting was still hot. On cooling the hole would shrink thus securing the bottom plug. This "short" pattern may have been designed to be able utilize case shot, but it appears that most were configured with percussion fuzes and full powder charge. Fuze employed was Parrott zinc one part percussion fuze, "improved" design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Projectile measures: diameter 6.36in., length 18.5in. (excluding bottom rivet), weight 91lbs., with sabot.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 299.

A0720...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with rivet, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Bottom is plugged with a rivet protruding from the bottom. The shell was cast with an open hole in the base, through which a rod was placed to hold the core during casting. After casting the rod was removed, the rod was removed and replaced with a drive in plug, this while the casting was still hot. On cooling the hole would shrink thus securing the bottom plug. This "short" pattern may have been designed to be able utilize case shot, but it appears that most were configured with percussion fuzes and full powder charge. Projectile measures: diameter 6.36in., length 18.5in. (excluding bottom rivet), weight 91lbs., with sabot. Sabot is marked "PATENTED 1861". High band sabot is not fired. Metal solid with some pitting. Parrott flanged time fuze has been fitted onto this projectile. Projectile is disarmed, casting is solid iron. Recovered: Portsmouth Virginia, a large number of shells were apparently recycled for metal during WWII, a few were saved.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 299.

A2298...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott design, Federal manufacture, bursting shell, long pattern with rivet, high band brass sabot with 10 rabbets, Parrott improved one part percussion fuze, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in.
Projectile was manufactured in the Federal arsenals following development of Parrott's patent. The sabot, referred to as "type II", utilized a thin wide brass band which was softer and more flexible than wrought iron, secured to the base with 10 rabbets. However performance was poor, the thin soft brass sabot either failed to take the rifling or had a tendency to separate on firing, resulting in shards of brass flying into the backs of the forward infantry. However for large caliber guns, fired from ships or forts, flying sabots was less of a problem and this pattern of sabot became the primary convention for siege guns. Bottom is plugged with a rivet protruding from the bottom. The shell was cast with an open hole in the base, through which a rod was placed to hold the core during casting. After casting the rod was removed, the rod was removed and replaced with a drive in plug, this while the casting was still hot. On cooling the hole would shrink thus securing the bottom plug. This "short" pattern may have been designed to be able utilize case shot, but it appears that most were configured with percussion fuzes and full powder charge. Fuze employed was Parrott zinc one part percussion fuze, "improved" design, edge of the fuze hole is milled flat, Jones pg. 81. Projectile measures: diameter 6.25in., length 19.25in. (excluding fuze), weight 95lbs. approx. with sabot. High band brass sabot separated on firing. Threaded fuze is missing (percussion). Metal solid, areas of pitting. Projectile is disarmed, open fuze hole exposes empty interior and there are two drill holes on the side. Original white metal fuze was likely lost in restoration, which is why it has both drill holes and an open fuze hole. Recovered: not known.
Ref: Bell Heavy Ordnance, pg. 299.


Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in. fragments.

A0739...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in., sabot low ring brass band sabot with 9 rabbets.

The sabots often flew off these big shells, usually in pieces. Here is one fully intact, it shows 9 lands and grooves. This is the Parrott Type III grooved ring sabot. Recovered: Richmond, Petersburg, Virginia 1865 campaign.


A2208.1...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in., nose section with partial fuze.

Large fragment of a Parrott 100 pounder, nose section, fuze was jammed deep into the fuze hole on impact.
Parrott 100 pounder fragment, large nose section.

A2208.2...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in., high band rabbeted brass ring sabot.

Large fragment of a Parrott 100 pounder, base section with high band sabot, 9 lands & grooves.
Parrott 100 pounder fragment, base section and sabot.

A2209...Rifled artillery projectile, Parrott 100 pounder rifle, 6.4in., nose section.

Large fragment of a Parrott 100 pounder, nose section, three fragments. These frags were recovered from a shell detonated by the DOD, thank you for breaking up an empty shell so we can study the pieces, nice job guys!
Parrott 100 pounder fragment, large nose section.


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