Civil War Relicman
Harry Ridgeway
Winchester, Virginia USA (changed hands 70 times in the Civil War!)
http://relicman.com/

Ridgeway Reference Library, Civil War plates and buckles
874..Confederate buckles and plates, carbine "sling" buckles

This is the "Ridgeway Reference Archive", a research tool for educational purposes only, and is provided at no cost to the reader. Some of the relics listed are retained in the author's collection, most reside in other collections and are not owned by the author. None of the items listed in this section are for sale, please refer to relicman.com sales listings for items offered for sale. This is a work in progress, I list items as I get to them, there are many patterns that are not listed yet, this list will be regularly updated as I get pictures and descriptions for more items. I will also correct mistakes, so if you see any please tell me. All items listed are believed to be authentic to the Civil War or as otherwise described. Any excavated relics have been recovered from private property with owners permission. This information is available for research purposes, pictures may be used by permission only
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Most information on this page is from:
Plates and Buckles of the American Military 1795 - 1874, by Sydney C. Kerksis
Confederate Belt Buckles & Plates, by Steve E Mullinax
American Military Belt Plates, by Michael J. O'Donnell & J.Duncan Campbell


Carbine sling buckle, likely Confederate wartime manufacture
Sling buckles were used to fasten as leather shoulder strap used to carry a carbine or a pouch. This pattern is similar to the Regulation 1841 Federal sling buckles, the proportions are different, buckle is believed to have been manufactured in a small southern shop for Confederate cavalry use, but could have been made by any blacksmith for other purposes. Construction is simple, the frame is cast or cut from sheet, the cross bar is brazed, and the flippers are cast or cut and bent around the cross bar.
Ref: Mullinax Expanded Edition, Plate 174.

P0942...Carbine sling buckle, likely Confederate wartime manufacture.
P0942A.JPG (26863 bytes) P0942B.JPG (28802 bytes) Sling buckles were used to fasten as leather shoulder strap used to carry a carbine or a pouch. This pattern is similar to the Regulation 1841 Federal sling buckles, the proportions are different, buckle is believed to have been manufactured in a small southern shop for Confederate cavalry use, but could have been made by any blacksmith for other purposes. Construction is simple, the frame is cast or cut from sheet, the cross bar is brazed, and the flippers are cast or cut and bent around the cross bar. Plate measures 68mm x 53mm. Dug plate, portion of leather remains. Recovered: Battle of Cedar Creek, Virginia 1864 campaign, by Kenneth Beauchamp.
Ref: Mullinax Expanded Edition, Plate 174.
Old Court House Civil War Museum, Winchester, Virginia.

P0988...Carbine sling buckle, likely Confederate wartime manufacture.
P0988A.JPG (29058 bytes) P0988B.JPG (27187 bytes) Sling buckles were used to fasten as leather shoulder strap used to carry a carbine or a pouch. This pattern is similar to the Regulation 1841 Federal sling buckles, the proportions are different, buckle is believed to have been manufactured in a small southern shop for Confederate cavalry use, but could have been made by any blacksmith for other purposes. Construction is simple, the frame is cast or cut from sheet, the cross bar is brazed, and the flippers are cast or cut and bent around the cross bar. Plate measures 66mm x 43mm. Dug plate, one flipper is probably missing. Recovered: Mississippi Hill, Fredericksburg, Virginia by Don Hayden.
Ref: Mullinax Expanded Edition, Plate 174.

P1261...Carbine sling buckle, likely Confederate wartime manufacture.
P1261A.JPG (31392 bytes) P1261B.JPG (30815 bytes) Sling buckles were used to fasten as leather shoulder strap used to carry a carbine or a pouch. This pattern is similar to the Regulation 1841 Federal sling buckles, the proportions are different, buckle is believed to have been manufactured in a small southern shop for Confederate cavalry use, but could have been made by any blacksmith for other purposes. Construction is simple, the frame is cast or cut from sheet, the cross bar is brazed, and the flippers are cast or cut and bent around the cross bar. Plate measures measures 93mm x 50mm. Dug plate, small break, both flippers intact. Recovered: eastern North Carolina.
Ref: Mullinax Expanded Edition, Plate 174.